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Low ankle-brachial index predicts an adverse 1-year outcome after acute coronary and cerebrovascular events.
J Thromb Haemost. 2006 Dec; 4(12):2599-606.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Low ankle-brachial Index (ABI) identifies patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease. The aim of this study was to correlate ABI value (normal or low) with 1-year clinical outcome in patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndromes or cerebrovascular diseases (CVD).

METHODS

ABI was measured in consecutive patients hospitalized because of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). An ABI lower than or equal to 0.90 was considered abnormal. The primary outcome of the study was the composite of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, non-fatal ischemic stroke, and death from any cause during the year following the index event.

RESULTS

An abnormal ABI was found in 27.2% of 1003 patients with acute coronary syndromes, and in 33.5% of 755 patients with acute CVD. After a median follow-up of 372 days, the frequency of the primary outcome was 10.8% (57/526) in patients with abnormal ABI and 5.9% (73/1232) in patients with normal ABI [odds ratio (OR) 1.96; 95% CI 1.36-2.81]. Death was more common in patients with abnormal ABI (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.22). Cardiovascular mortality accounted for 81.7% of overall mortality. ABI was predictive of adverse outcome after adjustment for vascular risk factors in the logistic regression analysis (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.24-3.01). The predictive value of ABI was mainly accounted for by patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndromes (adverse outcome: 12.8% in patients with abnormal ABI and 5.9% in patients with normal ABI, OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.47-3.76).

CONCLUSIONS

An abnormal ABI can be found in one-third of patients hospitalized for acute coronary or cerebrovascular events and is a predictor of an adverse 1-year outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medicina Interna e Cardiovascolare and Stroke Unit, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Perugia, Perugia, Italy. agnellig@unipg.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17002652

Citation

Agnelli, G, et al. "Low Ankle-brachial Index Predicts an Adverse 1-year Outcome After Acute Coronary and Cerebrovascular Events." Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : JTH, vol. 4, no. 12, 2006, pp. 2599-606.
Agnelli G, Cimminiello C, Meneghetti G, et al. Low ankle-brachial index predicts an adverse 1-year outcome after acute coronary and cerebrovascular events. J Thromb Haemost. 2006;4(12):2599-606.
Agnelli, G., Cimminiello, C., Meneghetti, G., & Urbinati, S. (2006). Low ankle-brachial index predicts an adverse 1-year outcome after acute coronary and cerebrovascular events. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : JTH, 4(12), 2599-606.
Agnelli G, et al. Low Ankle-brachial Index Predicts an Adverse 1-year Outcome After Acute Coronary and Cerebrovascular Events. J Thromb Haemost. 2006;4(12):2599-606. PubMed PMID: 17002652.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low ankle-brachial index predicts an adverse 1-year outcome after acute coronary and cerebrovascular events. AU - Agnelli,G, AU - Cimminiello,C, AU - Meneghetti,G, AU - Urbinati,S, AU - ,, Y1 - 2006/09/21/ PY - 2006/9/28/pubmed PY - 2007/1/9/medline PY - 2006/9/28/entrez SP - 2599 EP - 606 JF - Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH JO - J Thromb Haemost VL - 4 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Low ankle-brachial Index (ABI) identifies patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease. The aim of this study was to correlate ABI value (normal or low) with 1-year clinical outcome in patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndromes or cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). METHODS: ABI was measured in consecutive patients hospitalized because of acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). An ABI lower than or equal to 0.90 was considered abnormal. The primary outcome of the study was the composite of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, non-fatal ischemic stroke, and death from any cause during the year following the index event. RESULTS: An abnormal ABI was found in 27.2% of 1003 patients with acute coronary syndromes, and in 33.5% of 755 patients with acute CVD. After a median follow-up of 372 days, the frequency of the primary outcome was 10.8% (57/526) in patients with abnormal ABI and 5.9% (73/1232) in patients with normal ABI [odds ratio (OR) 1.96; 95% CI 1.36-2.81]. Death was more common in patients with abnormal ABI (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.22). Cardiovascular mortality accounted for 81.7% of overall mortality. ABI was predictive of adverse outcome after adjustment for vascular risk factors in the logistic regression analysis (OR 1.93; 95% CI 1.24-3.01). The predictive value of ABI was mainly accounted for by patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndromes (adverse outcome: 12.8% in patients with abnormal ABI and 5.9% in patients with normal ABI, OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.47-3.76). CONCLUSIONS: An abnormal ABI can be found in one-third of patients hospitalized for acute coronary or cerebrovascular events and is a predictor of an adverse 1-year outcome. SN - 1538-7933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17002652/Low_ankle_brachial_index_predicts_an_adverse_1_year_outcome_after_acute_coronary_and_cerebrovascular_events_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-7836.2006.02225.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -