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Treatment with MDMA from P11-20 disrupts spatial learning and path integration learning in adolescent rats but only spatial learning in older rats.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006 Dec; 189(3):307-18.P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Previous studies in rats showed that postnatal day (P)11-20 exposure to +/-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) causes learning and memory deficits in adulthood. The emergence and permanence of these learning deficits are currently unknown.

OBJECTIVE

This study was designed to investigate learning and memory deficits in adolescent (P30 or P40) and older (P180 or P360) rats exposed to MDMA from P11-20.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Within each litter half the animals were exposed to MDMA (20 mg/kg) and half to saline (SAL) twice a day (8 h apart) from P11-20. In experiment (exp) 1, behavioral testing began on either P30 or P40, whereas in exp 2, testing began on either P180 or P360. Offspring were tested in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM), a test of path integration learning (2 trials/day for 5 days), and the Morris water maze (MWM) (three phases, with 5 days of 4 trials/day and a probe trial on the sixth day per phase).

RESULTS

MDMA-treated rats took longer to find the platform and traveled a greater distance to find the platform at all ages tested in all phases of the MWM. MDMA-treated animals also spent less time in the target quadrant during probe trials. In the CWM, P30 and P40 animals took longer to find the goal and committed more errors in locating the goal, while P180 and P360 MDMA-treated animals performed similarly to SAL-treated animals.

CONCLUSION

The data suggest that the spatial learning and memory deficits induced by MDMA are long lasting, while the path integration deficits recover over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17016706

Citation

Skelton, Matthew R., et al. "Treatment With MDMA From P11-20 Disrupts Spatial Learning and Path Integration Learning in Adolescent Rats but Only Spatial Learning in Older Rats." Psychopharmacology, vol. 189, no. 3, 2006, pp. 307-18.
Skelton MR, Williams MT, Vorhees CV. Treatment with MDMA from P11-20 disrupts spatial learning and path integration learning in adolescent rats but only spatial learning in older rats. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006;189(3):307-18.
Skelton, M. R., Williams, M. T., & Vorhees, C. V. (2006). Treatment with MDMA from P11-20 disrupts spatial learning and path integration learning in adolescent rats but only spatial learning in older rats. Psychopharmacology, 189(3), 307-18.
Skelton MR, Williams MT, Vorhees CV. Treatment With MDMA From P11-20 Disrupts Spatial Learning and Path Integration Learning in Adolescent Rats but Only Spatial Learning in Older Rats. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006;189(3):307-18. PubMed PMID: 17016706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment with MDMA from P11-20 disrupts spatial learning and path integration learning in adolescent rats but only spatial learning in older rats. AU - Skelton,Matthew R, AU - Williams,Michael T, AU - Vorhees,Charles V, Y1 - 2006/10/03/ PY - 2006/04/04/received PY - 2006/08/11/accepted PY - 2006/10/4/pubmed PY - 2007/1/17/medline PY - 2006/10/4/entrez SP - 307 EP - 18 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl) VL - 189 IS - 3 N2 - RATIONALE: Previous studies in rats showed that postnatal day (P)11-20 exposure to +/-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) causes learning and memory deficits in adulthood. The emergence and permanence of these learning deficits are currently unknown. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate learning and memory deficits in adolescent (P30 or P40) and older (P180 or P360) rats exposed to MDMA from P11-20. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within each litter half the animals were exposed to MDMA (20 mg/kg) and half to saline (SAL) twice a day (8 h apart) from P11-20. In experiment (exp) 1, behavioral testing began on either P30 or P40, whereas in exp 2, testing began on either P180 or P360. Offspring were tested in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM), a test of path integration learning (2 trials/day for 5 days), and the Morris water maze (MWM) (three phases, with 5 days of 4 trials/day and a probe trial on the sixth day per phase). RESULTS: MDMA-treated rats took longer to find the platform and traveled a greater distance to find the platform at all ages tested in all phases of the MWM. MDMA-treated animals also spent less time in the target quadrant during probe trials. In the CWM, P30 and P40 animals took longer to find the goal and committed more errors in locating the goal, while P180 and P360 MDMA-treated animals performed similarly to SAL-treated animals. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that the spatial learning and memory deficits induced by MDMA are long lasting, while the path integration deficits recover over time. SN - 0033-3158 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17016706/Treatment_with_MDMA_from_P11_20_disrupts_spatial_learning_and_path_integration_learning_in_adolescent_rats_but_only_spatial_learning_in_older_rats_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-006-0563-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -