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Motor, visual and egocentric transformations in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder.
Child Care Health Dev. 2006 Nov; 32(6):633-47.CC

Abstract

AIM

This study aimed to test the internal modelling deficit (IMD) hypothesis using the mental rotation paradigm.

BACKGROUND

According to the IMD hypothesis, children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have an impaired ability to internally represent action. Thirty-six children (18 DCD) completed four tasks: two versions of a single-hand rotation task (with and without explicit imagery instructions), a whole-body imagery task and an alphanumeric rotation task.

RESULTS

There was partial support for the hypothesis that children with DCD would display an atypical pattern of performance on the hand rotation task, requiring implicit use of motor imagery. Overall, there were no significant differences between the DCD and control groups when the hand task was completed without explicit instructions, on either response time or accuracy. However, when imagery instructions were introduced, the controls were significantly more accurate than the DCD group, indicating that children with DCD were unable to benefit from explicit cuing. As predicted, the controls were also significantly more accurate than the DCD group on the whole-body task, with the accuracy of the DCD group barely rising above chance. Finally, and as expected, there was no difference between the groups on the alphanumeric task, a measure of visual (or object-related) imagery.

CONCLUSIONS

The inability of the DCD group to utilize specific motor imagery instructions and to perform egocentric transformations lends some support to the IMD hypothesis. Future work needs to address the question of whether the IMD itself is subgroup-specific.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Psychology, School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17018040

Citation

Williams, J, et al. "Motor, Visual and Egocentric Transformations in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder." Child: Care, Health and Development, vol. 32, no. 6, 2006, pp. 633-47.
Williams J, Thomas PR, Maruff P, et al. Motor, visual and egocentric transformations in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. Child Care Health Dev. 2006;32(6):633-47.
Williams, J., Thomas, P. R., Maruff, P., Butson, M., & Wilson, P. H. (2006). Motor, visual and egocentric transformations in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), 633-47.
Williams J, et al. Motor, Visual and Egocentric Transformations in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder. Child Care Health Dev. 2006;32(6):633-47. PubMed PMID: 17018040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Motor, visual and egocentric transformations in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. AU - Williams,J, AU - Thomas,P R, AU - Maruff,P, AU - Butson,M, AU - Wilson,P H, PY - 2006/10/5/pubmed PY - 2007/4/17/medline PY - 2006/10/5/entrez SP - 633 EP - 47 JF - Child: care, health and development JO - Child Care Health Dev VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - AIM: This study aimed to test the internal modelling deficit (IMD) hypothesis using the mental rotation paradigm. BACKGROUND: According to the IMD hypothesis, children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have an impaired ability to internally represent action. Thirty-six children (18 DCD) completed four tasks: two versions of a single-hand rotation task (with and without explicit imagery instructions), a whole-body imagery task and an alphanumeric rotation task. RESULTS: There was partial support for the hypothesis that children with DCD would display an atypical pattern of performance on the hand rotation task, requiring implicit use of motor imagery. Overall, there were no significant differences between the DCD and control groups when the hand task was completed without explicit instructions, on either response time or accuracy. However, when imagery instructions were introduced, the controls were significantly more accurate than the DCD group, indicating that children with DCD were unable to benefit from explicit cuing. As predicted, the controls were also significantly more accurate than the DCD group on the whole-body task, with the accuracy of the DCD group barely rising above chance. Finally, and as expected, there was no difference between the groups on the alphanumeric task, a measure of visual (or object-related) imagery. CONCLUSIONS: The inability of the DCD group to utilize specific motor imagery instructions and to perform egocentric transformations lends some support to the IMD hypothesis. Future work needs to address the question of whether the IMD itself is subgroup-specific. SN - 0305-1862 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17018040/Motor_visual_and_egocentric_transformations_in_children_with_Developmental_Coordination_Disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2214.2006.00688.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -