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Muscular performance after concentric and eccentric exercise in trained men.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Oct; 38(10):1770-81.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

We studied previously resistance-trained men and compared the effects of concentric and eccentric training on performance and structural muscle parameters.

METHODS

Seventeen trained individuals (age 26.9 +/- 3.4 yr) participated in 12 wk of either maximum concentric (N = 8) or eccentric (N = 9) resistance training of the elbow flexors. The functional performance was measured as the maximum concentric and eccentric strength and angular velocity at standard loads. Muscle cross-sectional area and cross-sectional area of single cells were used as measures of muscular hypertrophy. Fiber-type proportions were assessed by staining cells for myofibrillar ATPase.

RESULTS

Both eccentric and concentric training increased concentric strength to a similar extent (14 vs 18%), whereas eccentric training led to greater increases in eccentric strength than concentric training did (26 vs 9%). The maximum angular velocity at all loads was enhanced equally in both training groups. The cross-sectional area of both the elbow flexors (+11%) and of the type I and type IIA fibers increased only after the eccentric training. In addition, the relative cross-sectional area occupied by the type II fibers increased from 64 to 73% after the eccentric training. There were only minor changes in the fiber-type proportions.

CONCLUSION

The present data suggest that for resistance-trained men, increases in concentric strength and velocity performance after eccentric training are largely mediated by changes in fiber and muscle cross-sectional area. However, hypertrophy alone could not explain the increase in eccentric strength. Because the increases in strength and velocity performance after concentric training could not be ascribed to muscular adaptations alone, we suggest that they may be attributable to additional neural factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17019299

Citation

Vikne, Harald, et al. "Muscular Performance After Concentric and Eccentric Exercise in Trained Men." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 38, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1770-81.
Vikne H, Refsnes PE, Ekmark M, et al. Muscular performance after concentric and eccentric exercise in trained men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006;38(10):1770-81.
Vikne, H., Refsnes, P. E., Ekmark, M., Medbø, J. I., Gundersen, V., & Gundersen, K. (2006). Muscular performance after concentric and eccentric exercise in trained men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(10), 1770-81.
Vikne H, et al. Muscular Performance After Concentric and Eccentric Exercise in Trained Men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006;38(10):1770-81. PubMed PMID: 17019299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Muscular performance after concentric and eccentric exercise in trained men. AU - Vikne,Harald, AU - Refsnes,Per E, AU - Ekmark,Merete, AU - Medbø,Jon Ingulf, AU - Gundersen,Vidar, AU - Gundersen,Kristian, PY - 2006/10/5/pubmed PY - 2006/12/12/medline PY - 2006/10/5/entrez SP - 1770 EP - 81 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: We studied previously resistance-trained men and compared the effects of concentric and eccentric training on performance and structural muscle parameters. METHODS: Seventeen trained individuals (age 26.9 +/- 3.4 yr) participated in 12 wk of either maximum concentric (N = 8) or eccentric (N = 9) resistance training of the elbow flexors. The functional performance was measured as the maximum concentric and eccentric strength and angular velocity at standard loads. Muscle cross-sectional area and cross-sectional area of single cells were used as measures of muscular hypertrophy. Fiber-type proportions were assessed by staining cells for myofibrillar ATPase. RESULTS: Both eccentric and concentric training increased concentric strength to a similar extent (14 vs 18%), whereas eccentric training led to greater increases in eccentric strength than concentric training did (26 vs 9%). The maximum angular velocity at all loads was enhanced equally in both training groups. The cross-sectional area of both the elbow flexors (+11%) and of the type I and type IIA fibers increased only after the eccentric training. In addition, the relative cross-sectional area occupied by the type II fibers increased from 64 to 73% after the eccentric training. There were only minor changes in the fiber-type proportions. CONCLUSION: The present data suggest that for resistance-trained men, increases in concentric strength and velocity performance after eccentric training are largely mediated by changes in fiber and muscle cross-sectional area. However, hypertrophy alone could not explain the increase in eccentric strength. Because the increases in strength and velocity performance after concentric training could not be ascribed to muscular adaptations alone, we suggest that they may be attributable to additional neural factors. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17019299/Muscular_performance_after_concentric_and_eccentric_exercise_in_trained_men_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000229568.17284.ab DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -