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Congenital missing permanent teeth in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and unilateral cleft lip and palate patients.
Angle Orthod. 2007 Jan; 77(1):88-93.AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the differences in the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type (permanent maxillary lateral incisor [MLI] and maxillary second premolar [MSP]) and sidedness (cleft vs noncleft) between boys and girls in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA) and unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

This study used the charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 90 UCLA patients and 204 UCLP patients (ages 6 to 13 years). Binomial test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, maximum likelihood analysis of variance, and the odds ratio were performed.

RESULTS

According to the relationship between the congenital missing teeth pattern and the cleft type, the UCLP patients had 2.98 times more missing MLIs and 1.80 times more missing MSPs than did the UCLA patients. The MLI was congenitally missing more in boys than in girls, but the MSP showed the opposite tendency. Boys had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs on the cleft side than did girls. However, on the noncleft side and both sides, girls had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs than did boys. Results showed a gender-dominant pattern of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest that gender and cleft type might affect the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type and sidedness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Department of Orthodontics, Seoul, South Korea. drwhite@unitel.co.krNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17029545

Citation

Baek, Seung-Hak, and Na-Young Kim. "Congenital Missing Permanent Teeth in Korean Unilateral Cleft Lip and Alveolus and Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients." The Angle Orthodontist, vol. 77, no. 1, 2007, pp. 88-93.
Baek SH, Kim NY. Congenital missing permanent teeth in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and unilateral cleft lip and palate patients. Angle Orthod. 2007;77(1):88-93.
Baek, S. H., & Kim, N. Y. (2007). Congenital missing permanent teeth in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and unilateral cleft lip and palate patients. The Angle Orthodontist, 77(1), 88-93.
Baek SH, Kim NY. Congenital Missing Permanent Teeth in Korean Unilateral Cleft Lip and Alveolus and Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients. Angle Orthod. 2007;77(1):88-93. PubMed PMID: 17029545.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Congenital missing permanent teeth in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and unilateral cleft lip and palate patients. AU - Baek,Seung-Hak, AU - Kim,Na-Young, PY - 2005/11/01/received PY - 2006/01/01/accepted PY - 2006/10/13/pubmed PY - 2007/2/28/medline PY - 2006/10/13/entrez SP - 88 EP - 93 JF - The Angle orthodontist JO - Angle Orthod VL - 77 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the differences in the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type (permanent maxillary lateral incisor [MLI] and maxillary second premolar [MSP]) and sidedness (cleft vs noncleft) between boys and girls in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA) and unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study used the charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 90 UCLA patients and 204 UCLP patients (ages 6 to 13 years). Binomial test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, maximum likelihood analysis of variance, and the odds ratio were performed. RESULTS: According to the relationship between the congenital missing teeth pattern and the cleft type, the UCLP patients had 2.98 times more missing MLIs and 1.80 times more missing MSPs than did the UCLA patients. The MLI was congenitally missing more in boys than in girls, but the MSP showed the opposite tendency. Boys had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs on the cleft side than did girls. However, on the noncleft side and both sides, girls had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs than did boys. Results showed a gender-dominant pattern of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that gender and cleft type might affect the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type and sidedness. SN - 0003-3219 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17029545/Congenital_missing_permanent_teeth_in_Korean_unilateral_cleft_lip_and_alveolus_and_unilateral_cleft_lip_and_palate_patients_ L2 - https://meridian.allenpress.com/angle-orthodontist/article-lookup/doi/10.2319/113005-419R.1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -