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Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities.
Soc Sci Med. 2007 Jan; 64(1):64-76.SS

Abstract

Studies from the West have shown an increased risk of mortality with various indicators of social isolation. In this study, we examine associations of marital status and intergenerational co-residence with mortality in Lebanon, a country that suffered wars and atrocities for almost 16 years. Using data from a retrospective 10-year follow-up study (1984-1994) among 1567 adults aged 50 years and older in Beirut, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rates (per 1000 person-years) were computed for men and women separately. Age-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, and associations were examined using multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Most men (91.3%) were married at baseline, in contrast to only 55.4% of women. Compared to men, women were more likely to be living in one- and three-generation households and with a married child at baseline. While widowhood was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men only, being never married was associated with a higher CVD mortality risk among men and women. The presence of an adult married child was associated with a significantly higher mortality risk for men and women, even after adjusting for household socioeconomic indicators, marital status, lifestyle variables or pre-existing health-related conditions (hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes) at baseline. The popular belief that co-residence with adult children reflects greater support networks and an avenue for old age security may not be a valid presumption in the Lebanese context during times of war.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon. ansibai@aub.edu.lbNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17030373

Citation

Sibai, Abla M., et al. "Marital Status, Intergenerational Co-residence and Cardiovascular and All-cause Mortality Among Middle-aged and Older Men and Women During Wartime in Beirut: Gains and Liabilities." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 64, no. 1, 2007, pp. 64-76.
Sibai AM, Yount KM, Fletcher A. Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities. Soc Sci Med. 2007;64(1):64-76.
Sibai, A. M., Yount, K. M., & Fletcher, A. (2007). Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 64(1), 64-76.
Sibai AM, Yount KM, Fletcher A. Marital Status, Intergenerational Co-residence and Cardiovascular and All-cause Mortality Among Middle-aged and Older Men and Women During Wartime in Beirut: Gains and Liabilities. Soc Sci Med. 2007;64(1):64-76. PubMed PMID: 17030373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities. AU - Sibai,Abla M, AU - Yount,Kathryn M, AU - Fletcher,Astrid, Y1 - 2006/10/06/ PY - 2005/12/13/received PY - 2006/10/13/pubmed PY - 2007/3/21/medline PY - 2006/10/13/entrez SP - 64 EP - 76 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 64 IS - 1 N2 - Studies from the West have shown an increased risk of mortality with various indicators of social isolation. In this study, we examine associations of marital status and intergenerational co-residence with mortality in Lebanon, a country that suffered wars and atrocities for almost 16 years. Using data from a retrospective 10-year follow-up study (1984-1994) among 1567 adults aged 50 years and older in Beirut, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rates (per 1000 person-years) were computed for men and women separately. Age-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, and associations were examined using multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Most men (91.3%) were married at baseline, in contrast to only 55.4% of women. Compared to men, women were more likely to be living in one- and three-generation households and with a married child at baseline. While widowhood was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men only, being never married was associated with a higher CVD mortality risk among men and women. The presence of an adult married child was associated with a significantly higher mortality risk for men and women, even after adjusting for household socioeconomic indicators, marital status, lifestyle variables or pre-existing health-related conditions (hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes) at baseline. The popular belief that co-residence with adult children reflects greater support networks and an avenue for old age security may not be a valid presumption in the Lebanese context during times of war. SN - 0277-9536 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17030373/Marital_status_intergenerational_co_residence_and_cardiovascular_and_all_cause_mortality_among_middle_aged_and_older_men_and_women_during_wartime_in_Beirut:_gains_and_liabilities_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277-9536(06)00408-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -