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Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case-control study using life grid interviews.
Thorax. 2006 Dec; 61(12):1076-82.T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The incidence of lung cancer among women is high in the highly industrialised area of Teesside in north-east England. Previous research has implicated industrial pollution as a possible cause. A study was undertaken to investigate whether prolonged residence close to heavy industry is associated with lung cancer among women in Teesside.

METHODS

Two hundred and four women aged <80 years with incident primary lung cancer and 339 age matched community controls were recruited to a population based case-control study. Life course residential, occupational, and active and passive smoking histories were obtained using an interviewer administered questionnaire.

RESULTS

The age adjusted odds ratio (OR) for lung cancer among people living >25 years v 0 years near (within 0-5 km) heavy industry in Teesside was 2.13 (95% CI 1.34 to 3.38). After adjustment for confounding factors the OR was 1.83 (95% CI 0.82 to 4.08) for >25 years or 1.10 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.26) for an additional 10 years living near industry. ORs were similar after residence near heavy industry outside Teesside was also included, and when latency was allowed for by disregarding residential exposures within the last 20 years. Adjustment for active smoking had the greatest effect on the OR.

CONCLUSIONS

This population based study using life grid interviews for life course exposure assessment has addressed many deficiencies in the design of previous studies. The findings support those in most of the international literature of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. Richard.Edwards@otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17040935

Citation

Edwards, R, et al. "Does Living Near Heavy Industry Cause Lung Cancer in Women? a Case-control Study Using Life Grid Interviews." Thorax, vol. 61, no. 12, 2006, pp. 1076-82.
Edwards R, Pless-Mulloli T, Howel D, et al. Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case-control study using life grid interviews. Thorax. 2006;61(12):1076-82.
Edwards, R., Pless-Mulloli, T., Howel, D., Chadwick, T., Bhopal, R., Harrison, R., & Gribbin, H. (2006). Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case-control study using life grid interviews. Thorax, 61(12), 1076-82.
Edwards R, et al. Does Living Near Heavy Industry Cause Lung Cancer in Women? a Case-control Study Using Life Grid Interviews. Thorax. 2006;61(12):1076-82. PubMed PMID: 17040935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does living near heavy industry cause lung cancer in women? A case-control study using life grid interviews. AU - Edwards,R, AU - Pless-Mulloli,T, AU - Howel,D, AU - Chadwick,T, AU - Bhopal,R, AU - Harrison,R, AU - Gribbin,H, Y1 - 2006/10/13/ PY - 2006/10/17/pubmed PY - 2007/1/31/medline PY - 2006/10/17/entrez SP - 1076 EP - 82 JF - Thorax JO - Thorax VL - 61 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: The incidence of lung cancer among women is high in the highly industrialised area of Teesside in north-east England. Previous research has implicated industrial pollution as a possible cause. A study was undertaken to investigate whether prolonged residence close to heavy industry is associated with lung cancer among women in Teesside. METHODS: Two hundred and four women aged <80 years with incident primary lung cancer and 339 age matched community controls were recruited to a population based case-control study. Life course residential, occupational, and active and passive smoking histories were obtained using an interviewer administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The age adjusted odds ratio (OR) for lung cancer among people living >25 years v 0 years near (within 0-5 km) heavy industry in Teesside was 2.13 (95% CI 1.34 to 3.38). After adjustment for confounding factors the OR was 1.83 (95% CI 0.82 to 4.08) for >25 years or 1.10 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.26) for an additional 10 years living near industry. ORs were similar after residence near heavy industry outside Teesside was also included, and when latency was allowed for by disregarding residential exposures within the last 20 years. Adjustment for active smoking had the greatest effect on the OR. CONCLUSIONS: This population based study using life grid interviews for life course exposure assessment has addressed many deficiencies in the design of previous studies. The findings support those in most of the international literature of a modestly raised risk of lung cancer with prolonged residence close to heavy industry, although the confidence intervals were wide. The effect of air pollution on the incidence of lung cancer merits continued study. SN - 0040-6376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17040935/Does_living_near_heavy_industry_cause_lung_cancer_in_women_A_case_control_study_using_life_grid_interviews_ L2 - https://thorax.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17040935 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -