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Self-stigma in women with borderline personality disorder and women with social phobia.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006 Oct; 194(10):766-73.JN

Abstract

Little is known about how women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and women with social phobia react to mental illness stigma. The goal of this study was to assess empirically self-stigma and its correlates in these groups. Self-stigma and related constructs were measured by self-report questionnaires among 60 women with BPD and 30 women with social phobia. Self-stigma was inversely related to self-esteem, self-efficacy, and quality of life and predicted low self-esteem after controlling for depression and shame-proneness. Stereotype awareness was not significantly correlated with self-esteem or quality of life. While there was no difference in stereotype awareness between women with BPD and women with social phobia, women with BPD showed higher self-stigma than women with social phobia. Self-stigma is associated with low self-esteem and other indices of poor psychological well-being. In comparison to women with social phobia, women with BPD suffer from more self-stigma. This may reflect intense labeling processes as being mentally ill due to repeated hospitalizations, frequent interpersonal difficulties, and visible scars.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg, Germany. nicolas_ruesch@psyallg.ukl.uni-freiburg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17041289

Citation

Rüsch, Nicolas, et al. "Self-stigma in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder and Women With Social Phobia." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 194, no. 10, 2006, pp. 766-73.
Rüsch N, Hölzer A, Hermann C, et al. Self-stigma in women with borderline personality disorder and women with social phobia. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006;194(10):766-73.
Rüsch, N., Hölzer, A., Hermann, C., Schramm, E., Jacob, G. A., Bohus, M., Lieb, K., & Corrigan, P. W. (2006). Self-stigma in women with borderline personality disorder and women with social phobia. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 194(10), 766-73.
Rüsch N, et al. Self-stigma in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder and Women With Social Phobia. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2006;194(10):766-73. PubMed PMID: 17041289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-stigma in women with borderline personality disorder and women with social phobia. AU - Rüsch,Nicolas, AU - Hölzer,Aurelia, AU - Hermann,Christiane, AU - Schramm,Elisabeth, AU - Jacob,Gitta A, AU - Bohus,Martin, AU - Lieb,Klaus, AU - Corrigan,Patrick W, PY - 2006/10/17/pubmed PY - 2006/11/15/medline PY - 2006/10/17/entrez SP - 766 EP - 73 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 194 IS - 10 N2 - Little is known about how women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and women with social phobia react to mental illness stigma. The goal of this study was to assess empirically self-stigma and its correlates in these groups. Self-stigma and related constructs were measured by self-report questionnaires among 60 women with BPD and 30 women with social phobia. Self-stigma was inversely related to self-esteem, self-efficacy, and quality of life and predicted low self-esteem after controlling for depression and shame-proneness. Stereotype awareness was not significantly correlated with self-esteem or quality of life. While there was no difference in stereotype awareness between women with BPD and women with social phobia, women with BPD showed higher self-stigma than women with social phobia. Self-stigma is associated with low self-esteem and other indices of poor psychological well-being. In comparison to women with social phobia, women with BPD suffer from more self-stigma. This may reflect intense labeling processes as being mentally ill due to repeated hospitalizations, frequent interpersonal difficulties, and visible scars. SN - 0022-3018 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17041289/Self_stigma_in_women_with_borderline_personality_disorder_and_women_with_social_phobia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nmd.0000239898.48701.dc DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -