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Swimming performance, metabolic rates, and their correlates in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica.
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2006 Nov-Dec; 79(6):1046-57.PB

Abstract

The dramatic escape response of some scallops is modified by reproductive investment and by acclimation temperature. Despite considerable knowledge of the physiology of the escape response, functional links between escape response performance, organismal rates of oxygen uptake, and tissue metabolic capacities are little known. We measured oxygen consumption rates (standard, maximal, and aerobic scope), escape behavior (initial and repeat performance), tissue mass, condition index, protein content, and tissue metabolic capacities in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica to examine links between these parameters. Postexercise oxygen consumption rates were positively linked to contraction rate (repeat test) and to pyruvate kinase activity in the adductor muscle but negatively linked to digestive gland wet mass. Swimming behavior was mainly related to activity of glycolytic enzymes, and enzymatic activities were related to anatomic parameters. Scallop behavior and physiology change with size, both within our samples and on a larger scale. Small scallops showed more intense swimming activity and had higher arginine kinase activities but lower glycolytic enzyme activities in their adductor muscle than larger scallops. This corresponds to the ontogenetic change in susceptibility to predation and in habitat use observed in C. islandica.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17041870

Citation

Tremblay, Isabelle, et al. "Swimming Performance, Metabolic Rates, and Their Correlates in the Iceland Scallop Chlamys Islandica." Physiological and Biochemical Zoology : PBZ, vol. 79, no. 6, 2006, pp. 1046-57.
Tremblay I, Guderley HE, Frechette M. Swimming performance, metabolic rates, and their correlates in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica. Physiol Biochem Zool. 2006;79(6):1046-57.
Tremblay, I., Guderley, H. E., & Frechette, M. (2006). Swimming performance, metabolic rates, and their correlates in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology : PBZ, 79(6), 1046-57.
Tremblay I, Guderley HE, Frechette M. Swimming Performance, Metabolic Rates, and Their Correlates in the Iceland Scallop Chlamys Islandica. Physiol Biochem Zool. 2006 Nov-Dec;79(6):1046-57. PubMed PMID: 17041870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Swimming performance, metabolic rates, and their correlates in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica. AU - Tremblay,Isabelle, AU - Guderley,Helga E, AU - Frechette,Marcel, Y1 - 2006/10/05/ PY - 2006/07/11/accepted PY - 2006/10/17/pubmed PY - 2007/1/11/medline PY - 2006/10/17/entrez SP - 1046 EP - 57 JF - Physiological and biochemical zoology : PBZ JO - Physiol. Biochem. Zool. VL - 79 IS - 6 N2 - The dramatic escape response of some scallops is modified by reproductive investment and by acclimation temperature. Despite considerable knowledge of the physiology of the escape response, functional links between escape response performance, organismal rates of oxygen uptake, and tissue metabolic capacities are little known. We measured oxygen consumption rates (standard, maximal, and aerobic scope), escape behavior (initial and repeat performance), tissue mass, condition index, protein content, and tissue metabolic capacities in the Iceland scallop Chlamys islandica to examine links between these parameters. Postexercise oxygen consumption rates were positively linked to contraction rate (repeat test) and to pyruvate kinase activity in the adductor muscle but negatively linked to digestive gland wet mass. Swimming behavior was mainly related to activity of glycolytic enzymes, and enzymatic activities were related to anatomic parameters. Scallop behavior and physiology change with size, both within our samples and on a larger scale. Small scallops showed more intense swimming activity and had higher arginine kinase activities but lower glycolytic enzyme activities in their adductor muscle than larger scallops. This corresponds to the ontogenetic change in susceptibility to predation and in habitat use observed in C. islandica. SN - 1522-2152 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17041870/Swimming_performance_metabolic_rates_and_their_correlates_in_the_Iceland_scallop_Chlamys_islandica_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/507780 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -