Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Menstrual migraine: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and impact.
Headache. 2006 Oct; 46 Suppl 2:S55-60.H

Abstract

The incidence of migraine varies over the course of the menstrual cycle. In the general population, approximately 60% of women with migraine report an increased frequency of headache during menses. The estrogen withdrawal that occurs just prior to the onset of menses and that leads to loss of serotonergic tone is thought to be the trigger for headaches that arise at this time of the menstrual cycle. The ability of triptans, specific serotonin receptor agonists, to prevent menstrual migraine is consistent with this hypothesis. Moreover, compared with headaches that occur during other times in the cycle, menstrual migraines are more severe in most women and may be of longer duration, as well as more resistant to treatment in a subset of women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harvard Medical School, Graham Headache Centre, Boston, MA 02130, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17044842

Citation

Loder, Elizabeth W.. "Menstrual Migraine: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Impact." Headache, vol. 46 Suppl 2, 2006, pp. S55-60.
Loder EW. Menstrual migraine: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and impact. Headache. 2006;46 Suppl 2:S55-60.
Loder, E. W. (2006). Menstrual migraine: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and impact. Headache, 46 Suppl 2, S55-60.
Loder EW. Menstrual Migraine: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Impact. Headache. 2006;46 Suppl 2:S55-60. PubMed PMID: 17044842.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Menstrual migraine: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and impact. A1 - Loder,Elizabeth W, PY - 2006/10/19/pubmed PY - 2007/5/2/medline PY - 2006/10/19/entrez SP - S55 EP - 60 JF - Headache JO - Headache VL - 46 Suppl 2 N2 - The incidence of migraine varies over the course of the menstrual cycle. In the general population, approximately 60% of women with migraine report an increased frequency of headache during menses. The estrogen withdrawal that occurs just prior to the onset of menses and that leads to loss of serotonergic tone is thought to be the trigger for headaches that arise at this time of the menstrual cycle. The ability of triptans, specific serotonin receptor agonists, to prevent menstrual migraine is consistent with this hypothesis. Moreover, compared with headaches that occur during other times in the cycle, menstrual migraines are more severe in most women and may be of longer duration, as well as more resistant to treatment in a subset of women. SN - 0017-8748 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17044842/Menstrual_migraine:_pathophysiology_diagnosis_and_impact_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2006.00555.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -