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Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients.
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Nov; 41(11):1305-11.SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The treatment of celiac disease is based on lifelong withdrawal of foods containing gluten. Unfortunately, compliance with a gluten-free diet has proved poor in many patients (mainly due to its low palatability), emphasizing the need for cereal varieties that are not toxic for celiac patients. In evolutionary terms, Triticum monococcum is the oldest and most primitive cultivated wheat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of T. monococcum on small intestinal mucosa, using an in vitro organ culture system.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Distal duodenum biopsies of 12 treated celiac patients and 17 control subjects were cultured for 24 h with T. aestivum (bread) gliadin (1 mg/ml) or with T. monococcum gliadin (1 mg/ml). Biopsies cultured with medium alone served as controls. Each biopsy was used for conventional histological examination and for immunohistochemical detection of CD3 + intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and HLA-DR. Secreted cytokine protein interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was measured in the culture supernatant using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay.

RESULTS

Significant morphological changes, HLA-DR overexpression in the crypt epithelium and an increased number of CD3 + IELs, found after bread gliadin exposure, were not observed in celiac biopsies cultured with T. monococcum gliadin. In contrast, with bread gliadin, there was no significant IFN-gamma response after culture with monococcum gliadin. Similarly, biopsies from normal controls did not respond to bread or monococcum gliadin stimulation.

CONCLUSIONS

These data show a lack of toxicity of T. monococcum gliadin in an in vitro organ culture system, suggesting new dietary opportunities for celiac patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, Padua University, Italy. daniela.pizzuti@unipd.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17060124

Citation

Pizzuti, Daniela, et al. "Lack of Intestinal Mucosal Toxicity of Triticum Monococcum in Celiac Disease Patients." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 41, no. 11, 2006, pp. 1305-11.
Pizzuti D, Buda A, D'Odorico A, et al. Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006;41(11):1305-11.
Pizzuti, D., Buda, A., D'Odorico, A., D'Incà, R., Chiarelli, S., Curioni, A., & Martines, D. (2006). Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 41(11), 1305-11.
Pizzuti D, et al. Lack of Intestinal Mucosal Toxicity of Triticum Monococcum in Celiac Disease Patients. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006;41(11):1305-11. PubMed PMID: 17060124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of intestinal mucosal toxicity of Triticum monococcum in celiac disease patients. AU - Pizzuti,Daniela, AU - Buda,Andrea, AU - D'Odorico,Anna, AU - D'Incà,Renata, AU - Chiarelli,Silvia, AU - Curioni,Andrea, AU - Martines,Diego, PY - 2006/10/25/pubmed PY - 2007/1/25/medline PY - 2006/10/25/entrez SP - 1305 EP - 11 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand J Gastroenterol VL - 41 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The treatment of celiac disease is based on lifelong withdrawal of foods containing gluten. Unfortunately, compliance with a gluten-free diet has proved poor in many patients (mainly due to its low palatability), emphasizing the need for cereal varieties that are not toxic for celiac patients. In evolutionary terms, Triticum monococcum is the oldest and most primitive cultivated wheat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of T. monococcum on small intestinal mucosa, using an in vitro organ culture system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Distal duodenum biopsies of 12 treated celiac patients and 17 control subjects were cultured for 24 h with T. aestivum (bread) gliadin (1 mg/ml) or with T. monococcum gliadin (1 mg/ml). Biopsies cultured with medium alone served as controls. Each biopsy was used for conventional histological examination and for immunohistochemical detection of CD3 + intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and HLA-DR. Secreted cytokine protein interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was measured in the culture supernatant using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. RESULTS: Significant morphological changes, HLA-DR overexpression in the crypt epithelium and an increased number of CD3 + IELs, found after bread gliadin exposure, were not observed in celiac biopsies cultured with T. monococcum gliadin. In contrast, with bread gliadin, there was no significant IFN-gamma response after culture with monococcum gliadin. Similarly, biopsies from normal controls did not respond to bread or monococcum gliadin stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: These data show a lack of toxicity of T. monococcum gliadin in an in vitro organ culture system, suggesting new dietary opportunities for celiac patients. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17060124/Lack_of_intestinal_mucosal_toxicity_of_Triticum_monococcum_in_celiac_disease_patients_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365520600699983 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -