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Endogenous testosterone levels, physical performance, and fall risk in older men.
Arch Intern Med. 2006 Oct 23; 166(19):2124-31.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Gonadal steroid levels decline with age in men. Whether low testosterone levels affect the development of common age-related disorders, including physical functioning and falling, is unclear.

METHODS

This longitudinal, observational follow-up study sought to determine whether low testosterone levels are associated with physical performance and fall risk in older men. A total of 2587 community-based men aged 65 to 99 years were selected using a stratified random sampling scheme from a study cohort of 5995 volunteers. Bioavailable testosterone and estradiol levels and physical performance measures were determined from baseline. Incident falls were ascertained every 4 months during 4 years of follow-up. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate risk ratios for the relation of sex steroids to falls.

RESULTS

Fifty-six percent of the men reported at least 1 fall; many fell frequently. Lower bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with increased fall risk. Men with testosterone levels in the lowest quartile had a 40% higher fall risk than those in the highest quartile. The effect of low testosterone levels was most apparent in younger men (65-69 years) (relative risk, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.7); testosterone level was not associated with falls in the oldest men (>/=80 years). Lower testosterone concentrations were associated with reduced physical performance. However, the association between low testosterone levels and fall risk persisted despite adjustment for performance.

CONCLUSIONS

Falls were common among older men. Fall risk was higher in men with lower bioavailable testosterone levels. The effect of testosterone level was independent of poorer physical performance, suggesting that the effect of testosterone on fall risk may be mediated by other androgen actions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA. orwoll@ohsu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17060543

Citation

Orwoll, Eric, et al. "Endogenous Testosterone Levels, Physical Performance, and Fall Risk in Older Men." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 166, no. 19, 2006, pp. 2124-31.
Orwoll E, Lambert LC, Marshall LM, et al. Endogenous testosterone levels, physical performance, and fall risk in older men. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(19):2124-31.
Orwoll, E., Lambert, L. C., Marshall, L. M., Blank, J., Barrett-Connor, E., Cauley, J., Ensrud, K., & Cummings, S. R. (2006). Endogenous testosterone levels, physical performance, and fall risk in older men. Archives of Internal Medicine, 166(19), 2124-31.
Orwoll E, et al. Endogenous Testosterone Levels, Physical Performance, and Fall Risk in Older Men. Arch Intern Med. 2006 Oct 23;166(19):2124-31. PubMed PMID: 17060543.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endogenous testosterone levels, physical performance, and fall risk in older men. AU - Orwoll,Eric, AU - Lambert,Lori C, AU - Marshall,Lynn M, AU - Blank,Janet, AU - Barrett-Connor,Elizabeth, AU - Cauley,Jane, AU - Ensrud,Kris, AU - Cummings,Steven R, AU - ,, PY - 2006/10/25/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/10/25/entrez SP - 2124 EP - 31 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 166 IS - 19 N2 - BACKGROUND: Gonadal steroid levels decline with age in men. Whether low testosterone levels affect the development of common age-related disorders, including physical functioning and falling, is unclear. METHODS: This longitudinal, observational follow-up study sought to determine whether low testosterone levels are associated with physical performance and fall risk in older men. A total of 2587 community-based men aged 65 to 99 years were selected using a stratified random sampling scheme from a study cohort of 5995 volunteers. Bioavailable testosterone and estradiol levels and physical performance measures were determined from baseline. Incident falls were ascertained every 4 months during 4 years of follow-up. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate risk ratios for the relation of sex steroids to falls. RESULTS: Fifty-six percent of the men reported at least 1 fall; many fell frequently. Lower bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with increased fall risk. Men with testosterone levels in the lowest quartile had a 40% higher fall risk than those in the highest quartile. The effect of low testosterone levels was most apparent in younger men (65-69 years) (relative risk, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.7); testosterone level was not associated with falls in the oldest men (>/=80 years). Lower testosterone concentrations were associated with reduced physical performance. However, the association between low testosterone levels and fall risk persisted despite adjustment for performance. CONCLUSIONS: Falls were common among older men. Fall risk was higher in men with lower bioavailable testosterone levels. The effect of testosterone level was independent of poorer physical performance, suggesting that the effect of testosterone on fall risk may be mediated by other androgen actions. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17060543/Endogenous_testosterone_levels_physical_performance_and_fall_risk_in_older_men_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.166.19.2124 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -