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Potentially modifiable metabolic factors and the risk of cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in urban African Americans with diabetes.
Ethn Dis. 2006 Autumn; 16(4):852-8.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are frequent causes of hospitalization in African Americans but have rarely been studied as coexisting diagnoses. We analyzed data from an urban African American diabetes patient population to identify variables associated with CVD hospitalizations.

DESIGN

Demographic, disease, and metabolic characteristics of patients seen from 1991 to 1997 were extracted from an electronic patient tracking system. Data were linked to a statewide hospital discharge dataset to establish who was hospitalized between 1998 and 2001. Patients with a CVD hospitalization were compared to patients without a CVD hospitalization.

RESULTS

3397 diabetes patients (average age, 56 years; 65% women; 92% African American) were included in the analysis; 24% had hospitalizations primarily due to CVD. Persons with CVD hospitalizations were older and had diabetes longer, and fewer were women. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were all higher among persons with CVD hospitalizations. In adjusted analyses, women had lower odds of experiencing a CVD hospitalization, but advancing age, diabetes duration, SBP, and LDL cholesterol were all associated with greater odds.

CONCLUSIONS

In this predominantly African American patient sample with diabetes, specific factors (age, sex, diabetes duration, LDL cholesterol, SBP) were associated with CVD hospitalizations. Additional studies are needed to determine whether management of metabolic risk factors in outpatient settings will translate into lower hospitalization rates due to CVD in this population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17061737

Citation

Cook, Curtiss B., et al. "Potentially Modifiable Metabolic Factors and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Hospitalizations in Urban African Americans With Diabetes." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 16, no. 4, 2006, pp. 852-8.
Cook CB, Hentz JG, Tsui C, et al. Potentially modifiable metabolic factors and the risk of cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in urban African Americans with diabetes. Ethn Dis. 2006;16(4):852-8.
Cook, C. B., Hentz, J. G., Tsui, C., Ziemer, D. C., Naylor, D. B., & Miller, W. J. (2006). Potentially modifiable metabolic factors and the risk of cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in urban African Americans with diabetes. Ethnicity & Disease, 16(4), 852-8.
Cook CB, et al. Potentially Modifiable Metabolic Factors and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Hospitalizations in Urban African Americans With Diabetes. Ethn Dis. 2006;16(4):852-8. PubMed PMID: 17061737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potentially modifiable metabolic factors and the risk of cardiovascular disease hospitalizations in urban African Americans with diabetes. AU - Cook,Curtiss B, AU - Hentz,Joseph G, AU - Tsui,Circe, AU - Ziemer,David C, AU - Naylor,Dorothy B, AU - Miller,William J, PY - 2006/10/26/pubmed PY - 2007/7/12/medline PY - 2006/10/26/entrez SP - 852 EP - 8 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are frequent causes of hospitalization in African Americans but have rarely been studied as coexisting diagnoses. We analyzed data from an urban African American diabetes patient population to identify variables associated with CVD hospitalizations. DESIGN: Demographic, disease, and metabolic characteristics of patients seen from 1991 to 1997 were extracted from an electronic patient tracking system. Data were linked to a statewide hospital discharge dataset to establish who was hospitalized between 1998 and 2001. Patients with a CVD hospitalization were compared to patients without a CVD hospitalization. RESULTS: 3397 diabetes patients (average age, 56 years; 65% women; 92% African American) were included in the analysis; 24% had hospitalizations primarily due to CVD. Persons with CVD hospitalizations were older and had diabetes longer, and fewer were women. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were all higher among persons with CVD hospitalizations. In adjusted analyses, women had lower odds of experiencing a CVD hospitalization, but advancing age, diabetes duration, SBP, and LDL cholesterol were all associated with greater odds. CONCLUSIONS: In this predominantly African American patient sample with diabetes, specific factors (age, sex, diabetes duration, LDL cholesterol, SBP) were associated with CVD hospitalizations. Additional studies are needed to determine whether management of metabolic risk factors in outpatient settings will translate into lower hospitalization rates due to CVD in this population. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17061737/Potentially_modifiable_metabolic_factors_and_the_risk_of_cardiovascular_disease_hospitalizations_in_urban_African_Americans_with_diabetes_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2236 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -