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Racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health in New York City.
Ethn Dis. 2006 Autumn; 16(4):900-8.ED

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the relationship between racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health before and after adjustment of individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics and to determine whether this association varies by race/ethnicity and perception of neighborhood.

DESIGN

The data are derived from the 1999 and 2002 New York City Social Indicator Survey, a cross-sectional survey. Logistic regression was used to assess the strength of the association between racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health before and after controlling for other covariates.

SETTING

The survey was conducted in New York City in 1999 and 2002.

PARTICIPANTS

A final sample of 2,845 individuals who self-identified as White, Black, Hispanic, or Asian was linked by zip code to the 2000 US Census.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Self-reported health was used as a dichotomous variable, good health status (including responses of excellent, very good, pretty good, or good) and poor health status (including the responses fair or poor).

RESULTS

Overall, 21.8% of respondents rated their health as poor, and those who live in neighborhoods with a high concentration of Blacks reported poorer health (27.2%) than those who live in neighborhoods with a low concentration of Blacks (17.3%, P<.001). Our findings suggest that individuals living in the most concentrated neighborhoods were almost two times more likely (odds ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.79) to perceive their health as poor compared to their counterparts living in less concentrated neighborhoods.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that poor self-reported health varies with patterns of concentration of Blacks in a neighborhood, after adjusting for individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics and perception of neighborhood. The results underscore the need for elucidating the pathways by which racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration affects health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17061744

Citation

White, Kellee, and Luisa N. Borrell. "Racial/ethnic Neighborhood Concentration and Self-reported Health in New York City." Ethnicity & Disease, vol. 16, no. 4, 2006, pp. 900-8.
White K, Borrell LN. Racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health in New York City. Ethn Dis. 2006;16(4):900-8.
White, K., & Borrell, L. N. (2006). Racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health in New York City. Ethnicity & Disease, 16(4), 900-8.
White K, Borrell LN. Racial/ethnic Neighborhood Concentration and Self-reported Health in New York City. Ethn Dis. 2006;16(4):900-8. PubMed PMID: 17061744.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health in New York City. AU - White,Kellee, AU - Borrell,Luisa N, PY - 2006/10/26/pubmed PY - 2007/7/12/medline PY - 2006/10/26/entrez SP - 900 EP - 8 JF - Ethnicity & disease JO - Ethn Dis VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health before and after adjustment of individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics and to determine whether this association varies by race/ethnicity and perception of neighborhood. DESIGN: The data are derived from the 1999 and 2002 New York City Social Indicator Survey, a cross-sectional survey. Logistic regression was used to assess the strength of the association between racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration and self-reported health before and after controlling for other covariates. SETTING: The survey was conducted in New York City in 1999 and 2002. PARTICIPANTS: A final sample of 2,845 individuals who self-identified as White, Black, Hispanic, or Asian was linked by zip code to the 2000 US Census. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Self-reported health was used as a dichotomous variable, good health status (including responses of excellent, very good, pretty good, or good) and poor health status (including the responses fair or poor). RESULTS: Overall, 21.8% of respondents rated their health as poor, and those who live in neighborhoods with a high concentration of Blacks reported poorer health (27.2%) than those who live in neighborhoods with a low concentration of Blacks (17.3%, P<.001). Our findings suggest that individuals living in the most concentrated neighborhoods were almost two times more likely (odds ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.79) to perceive their health as poor compared to their counterparts living in less concentrated neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that poor self-reported health varies with patterns of concentration of Blacks in a neighborhood, after adjusting for individual- and neighborhood-level characteristics and perception of neighborhood. The results underscore the need for elucidating the pathways by which racial/ethnic neighborhood concentration affects health. SN - 1049-510X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17061744/Racial/ethnic_neighborhood_concentration_and_self_reported_health_in_New_York_City_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -