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Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Oct; 14(10):1825-31.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize sugar-sweetened beverage intake of college students.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Undergraduates in an urban southern community campus were surveyed anonymously about sugared beverage consumption (soda, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet ice tea) in the past month.

RESULTS

Two hundred sixty-five undergraduates responded (66% women, 46% minority, 100% of volunteers solicited). Most students (95%) reported sugared beverage intake in the past month, and 65% reported daily intake. Men were more likely than women to report daily intake (74% vs. 61%, p = 0.035). Soda was the most common sugar-sweetened beverage. Black undergraduates reported higher sugared beverage intake than whites (p = 0.02), with 91% of blacks reporting sugar-sweetened fruit drink intake in the past month and 50% reporting daily consumption. Mean estimated caloric intake from combined types of sugar-sweetened beverages was significantly higher among black students than whites, 796 +/- 941 vs. 397 +/- 396 kcal/d (p = 0.0003); the primary source of sugar-sweetened beverage calories among blacks was sugared fruit drinks (556 +/- 918 kcal/d). Younger undergraduates reported significantly higher intake than older students (p = 0.025).

DISCUSSION

Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among undergraduates is substantial and likely contributes considerable non-nutritive calories, which may contribute to weight gain. Black undergraduates may be particularly vulnerable due to higher sugared beverage intake. Obesity prevention interventions targeting reductions in sugar-sweetened beverages in this population merit consideration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, #820, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA. WestDelia@uams.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17062813

Citation

West, Delia Smith, et al. "Self-reported Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake Among College Students." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 14, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1825-31.
West DS, Bursac Z, Quimby D, et al. Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(10):1825-31.
West, D. S., Bursac, Z., Quimby, D., Prewitt, T. E., Spatz, T., Nash, C., Mays, G., & Eddings, K. (2006). Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 14(10), 1825-31.
West DS, et al. Self-reported Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake Among College Students. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(10):1825-31. PubMed PMID: 17062813.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage intake among college students. AU - West,Delia Smith, AU - Bursac,Zoran, AU - Quimby,Donna, AU - Prewitt,T Elaine, AU - Spatz,Thea, AU - Nash,Creshelle, AU - Mays,Glen, AU - Eddings,Kenya, PY - 2006/10/26/pubmed PY - 2006/12/27/medline PY - 2006/10/26/entrez SP - 1825 EP - 31 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To characterize sugar-sweetened beverage intake of college students. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Undergraduates in an urban southern community campus were surveyed anonymously about sugared beverage consumption (soda, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, sweet ice tea) in the past month. RESULTS: Two hundred sixty-five undergraduates responded (66% women, 46% minority, 100% of volunteers solicited). Most students (95%) reported sugared beverage intake in the past month, and 65% reported daily intake. Men were more likely than women to report daily intake (74% vs. 61%, p = 0.035). Soda was the most common sugar-sweetened beverage. Black undergraduates reported higher sugared beverage intake than whites (p = 0.02), with 91% of blacks reporting sugar-sweetened fruit drink intake in the past month and 50% reporting daily consumption. Mean estimated caloric intake from combined types of sugar-sweetened beverages was significantly higher among black students than whites, 796 +/- 941 vs. 397 +/- 396 kcal/d (p = 0.0003); the primary source of sugar-sweetened beverage calories among blacks was sugared fruit drinks (556 +/- 918 kcal/d). Younger undergraduates reported significantly higher intake than older students (p = 0.025). DISCUSSION: Self-reported sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among undergraduates is substantial and likely contributes considerable non-nutritive calories, which may contribute to weight gain. Black undergraduates may be particularly vulnerable due to higher sugared beverage intake. Obesity prevention interventions targeting reductions in sugar-sweetened beverages in this population merit consideration. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17062813/Self_reported_sugar_sweetened_beverage_intake_among_college_students_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.210 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -