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Clinical effects and adverse reactions of off-label use of aripiprazole in children and adolescents with developmental disabilities.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2006 Oct; 16(5):549-60.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to report on the clinical efficacy and side effects of aripiprazole in treating behavioral symptoms of children with a developmental disability (DDs).

DESIGN/METHODS

A retrospective chart review of the first 32 children treated with aripiprazole at an urban clinic for children with DD was conducted.

RESULTS

Ages ranged from 5 to 19 years; 9 (28%) were female. Twenty four had diagnoses within the autistic spectrum and 18 had mental retardation (MR). Other disorders included: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder/disruptive behavior disorders (n = 13), mood disorders (n = 7), reactive attachment (n = 2), and sleep disorders (n = 2). Target symptoms included aggression, hyperactivity, impulsivity and, self-injurious behaviors. Twenty eight of the children were switched from another antipsychotic. The mean daily aripiprazole starting dose was 7.1 +/- 0.32 mg (0.17 mg/kg/day) and the mean daily maintenance dose was 10.55 +/- 6.9 mg (0.27 mg/kg/day). Aripiprazole had been used for a period between 6 and 15 months. Improvement in target symptoms was found in 56%. When treating a child with MR, the concomitant presence of an autistic spectrum diagnosis predicted a worse outcome. Side effects were reported in 16 (50%), with the most frequent being sleepiness (n = 6). Mean body mass index (BMI) rose from 22.5 to 24.1 (p = 0.003) over the follow up period, with changes in the BMI z scores. These changes were more pronounced in children younger than 12 years.

CONCLUSIONS

These results with aripiprazole in this difficult-to-treat population suggest that this medication warrants controlled studies of its effectiveness and safety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, R.F. Kennedy Center of Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. rvalicenti@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17069544

Citation

Valicenti-McDermott, Maria R., and Howard Demb. "Clinical Effects and Adverse Reactions of Off-label Use of Aripiprazole in Children and Adolescents With Developmental Disabilities." Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, vol. 16, no. 5, 2006, pp. 549-60.
Valicenti-McDermott MR, Demb H. Clinical effects and adverse reactions of off-label use of aripiprazole in children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2006;16(5):549-60.
Valicenti-McDermott, M. R., & Demb, H. (2006). Clinical effects and adverse reactions of off-label use of aripiprazole in children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 16(5), 549-60.
Valicenti-McDermott MR, Demb H. Clinical Effects and Adverse Reactions of Off-label Use of Aripiprazole in Children and Adolescents With Developmental Disabilities. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2006;16(5):549-60. PubMed PMID: 17069544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical effects and adverse reactions of off-label use of aripiprazole in children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. AU - Valicenti-McDermott,Maria R, AU - Demb,Howard, PY - 2006/10/31/pubmed PY - 2007/2/23/medline PY - 2006/10/31/entrez SP - 549 EP - 60 JF - Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology JO - J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report on the clinical efficacy and side effects of aripiprazole in treating behavioral symptoms of children with a developmental disability (DDs). DESIGN/METHODS: A retrospective chart review of the first 32 children treated with aripiprazole at an urban clinic for children with DD was conducted. RESULTS: Ages ranged from 5 to 19 years; 9 (28%) were female. Twenty four had diagnoses within the autistic spectrum and 18 had mental retardation (MR). Other disorders included: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder/disruptive behavior disorders (n = 13), mood disorders (n = 7), reactive attachment (n = 2), and sleep disorders (n = 2). Target symptoms included aggression, hyperactivity, impulsivity and, self-injurious behaviors. Twenty eight of the children were switched from another antipsychotic. The mean daily aripiprazole starting dose was 7.1 +/- 0.32 mg (0.17 mg/kg/day) and the mean daily maintenance dose was 10.55 +/- 6.9 mg (0.27 mg/kg/day). Aripiprazole had been used for a period between 6 and 15 months. Improvement in target symptoms was found in 56%. When treating a child with MR, the concomitant presence of an autistic spectrum diagnosis predicted a worse outcome. Side effects were reported in 16 (50%), with the most frequent being sleepiness (n = 6). Mean body mass index (BMI) rose from 22.5 to 24.1 (p = 0.003) over the follow up period, with changes in the BMI z scores. These changes were more pronounced in children younger than 12 years. CONCLUSIONS: These results with aripiprazole in this difficult-to-treat population suggest that this medication warrants controlled studies of its effectiveness and safety. SN - 1044-5463 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17069544/Clinical_effects_and_adverse_reactions_of_off_label_use_of_aripiprazole_in_children_and_adolescents_with_developmental_disabilities_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/cap.2006.16.549?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -