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Evaluation of an intensive insulin protocol for septic patients in a medical intensive care unit.
Crit Care Med. 2006 Dec; 34(12):2974-8.CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Intensive insulin therapy to normalize blood glucose may improve outcome in intensive care unit patients. We prospectively evaluated the implementation of an intensive insulin protocol in medical intensive care patients to identify and overcome obstacles that this complex therapy creates.

DESIGN

This prospective, quality assessment study was designed to establish a standard protocol for glucose control in critically ill patients.

SETTING

The study took place in the medical intensive care unit at the Medical University of South Carolina, a tertiary care center.

PATIENTS

Patients diagnosed with sepsis and two consecutive blood glucose measurements of >120 mg/dL were included in the study.

INTERVENTIONS

The protocol, targeting blood glucose of 80-120 mg/dL, was a multidisciplinary initiative involving extensive education of house staff before subject enrollment. Based on predefined criteria, patients were monitored daily for glycemic control, inclusion criteria, and protocol adherence. Protocol improvements were assessed at 6 and 12 months via nursing surveys.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

Seventy patients receiving insulin infusion for >8 hrs were included in data analysis, accounting for 4,920 glucose readings. Eighty-six hypoglycemic events were recorded, with the number of events decreasing from 7.6% to 0.3% by the final version of the protocol. Average duration on protocol was 6 days, and average time to target range was 5.4 hrs. Identifiable causes of hypoglycemia and survey results led to four protocol revisions by study completion.

CONCLUSIONS

In comparison to studies suggesting that normoglycemia is an easily achievable goal, our protocol often recorded glucose values <80 mg/dL, although values <60 mg/dL were rare and usually due to protocol violations. In the interval before automated glucose-sensing insulin infusion devices become available for the intensive care unit, the current protocol is available to assist others in achieving target glucose levels shown to improve mortality rate in an intensive care unit population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy Services, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17075371

Citation

Clayton, Stephanie B., et al. "Evaluation of an Intensive Insulin Protocol for Septic Patients in a Medical Intensive Care Unit." Critical Care Medicine, vol. 34, no. 12, 2006, pp. 2974-8.
Clayton SB, Mazur JE, Condren S, et al. Evaluation of an intensive insulin protocol for septic patients in a medical intensive care unit. Crit Care Med. 2006;34(12):2974-8.
Clayton, S. B., Mazur, J. E., Condren, S., Hermayer, K. L., & Strange, C. (2006). Evaluation of an intensive insulin protocol for septic patients in a medical intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine, 34(12), 2974-8.
Clayton SB, et al. Evaluation of an Intensive Insulin Protocol for Septic Patients in a Medical Intensive Care Unit. Crit Care Med. 2006;34(12):2974-8. PubMed PMID: 17075371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of an intensive insulin protocol for septic patients in a medical intensive care unit. AU - Clayton,Stephanie B, AU - Mazur,Joseph E, AU - Condren,Stacey, AU - Hermayer,Kathie L, AU - Strange,Charlie, PY - 2006/11/1/pubmed PY - 2006/12/27/medline PY - 2006/11/1/entrez SP - 2974 EP - 8 JF - Critical care medicine JO - Crit Care Med VL - 34 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Intensive insulin therapy to normalize blood glucose may improve outcome in intensive care unit patients. We prospectively evaluated the implementation of an intensive insulin protocol in medical intensive care patients to identify and overcome obstacles that this complex therapy creates. DESIGN: This prospective, quality assessment study was designed to establish a standard protocol for glucose control in critically ill patients. SETTING: The study took place in the medical intensive care unit at the Medical University of South Carolina, a tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Patients diagnosed with sepsis and two consecutive blood glucose measurements of >120 mg/dL were included in the study. INTERVENTIONS: The protocol, targeting blood glucose of 80-120 mg/dL, was a multidisciplinary initiative involving extensive education of house staff before subject enrollment. Based on predefined criteria, patients were monitored daily for glycemic control, inclusion criteria, and protocol adherence. Protocol improvements were assessed at 6 and 12 months via nursing surveys. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Seventy patients receiving insulin infusion for >8 hrs were included in data analysis, accounting for 4,920 glucose readings. Eighty-six hypoglycemic events were recorded, with the number of events decreasing from 7.6% to 0.3% by the final version of the protocol. Average duration on protocol was 6 days, and average time to target range was 5.4 hrs. Identifiable causes of hypoglycemia and survey results led to four protocol revisions by study completion. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to studies suggesting that normoglycemia is an easily achievable goal, our protocol often recorded glucose values <80 mg/dL, although values <60 mg/dL were rare and usually due to protocol violations. In the interval before automated glucose-sensing insulin infusion devices become available for the intensive care unit, the current protocol is available to assist others in achieving target glucose levels shown to improve mortality rate in an intensive care unit population. SN - 0090-3493 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17075371/Evaluation_of_an_intensive_insulin_protocol_for_septic_patients_in_a_medical_intensive_care_unit_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.CCM.0000248906.10399.CF DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -