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Primary school children from northeast Thailand are not at risk of selenium deficiency.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006; 15(4):474-81.AP

Abstract

Selenium has important roles as an antioxidant, in thyroid hormone metabolism, redox reactions, reproduction and immune function, but information on the selenium status of Thai children is limited. We have assessed the selenium status of 515 northeast Thai children (259 males; 256 females) aged 6 to 13 years from 10 rural schools in Ubon Ratchthani province. Serum selenium (n=515) was analyzed by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and dietary selenium intake by Hydride Generation Absorption Spectrophotometry from one-day duplicate diet composites, from 80 (40 females; 40 males) randomly selected children. Inter-relationships between serum selenium and selenium intakes, and other biochemical micronutrient indices were also examined. Mean (SD) serum selenium was 1.46 (0.24) micro mol/L. Concentrations were not affected by infection or haemoglobinopathies, but were dependent on school (P< 0.001), sex (P=0.038), and age group (P=0.003), with serum zinc as a significant covariate. None of the children had serum selenium concentrations indicative of clinical selenium deficiency (i.e. <0.1 micro mol/L). Significant correlations existed between serum selenium and serum zinc (r= 0.216; P < 0.001), serum retinol (r = 0.273; P < 0.001), urinary iodine (r = -0.110; P = 0.014), haemoglobin (r = 0.298; P <0.001), and haematocrit (r = 0.303; P< 0.001). Mean (SD) dietary selenium intake was 46 (22) micro g/d. Children with low serum selenium concentrations had a lower mean selenium intake than those with high serum selenium concentrations (38 +/- 17 vs.51 +/- 24 micro g/d; P< 0.010). In conclusion, there appears to be no risk of selenium deficiency among these northeast Thai children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17077062

Citation

Krittaphol, Woravimol, et al. "Primary School Children From Northeast Thailand Are Not at Risk of Selenium Deficiency." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 15, no. 4, 2006, pp. 474-81.
Krittaphol W, Bailey KB, Pongcharoen T, et al. Primary school children from northeast Thailand are not at risk of selenium deficiency. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006;15(4):474-81.
Krittaphol, W., Bailey, K. B., Pongcharoen, T., Winichagoon, P., Thomson, C., & Gibson, R. S. (2006). Primary school children from northeast Thailand are not at risk of selenium deficiency. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 15(4), 474-81.
Krittaphol W, et al. Primary School Children From Northeast Thailand Are Not at Risk of Selenium Deficiency. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2006;15(4):474-81. PubMed PMID: 17077062.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Primary school children from northeast Thailand are not at risk of selenium deficiency. AU - Krittaphol,Woravimol, AU - Bailey,Karl B, AU - Pongcharoen,Tippawan, AU - Winichagoon,Pattanee, AU - Thomson,Christine, AU - Gibson,Rosalind S, PY - 2006/11/2/pubmed PY - 2007/2/9/medline PY - 2006/11/2/entrez SP - 474 EP - 81 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - Selenium has important roles as an antioxidant, in thyroid hormone metabolism, redox reactions, reproduction and immune function, but information on the selenium status of Thai children is limited. We have assessed the selenium status of 515 northeast Thai children (259 males; 256 females) aged 6 to 13 years from 10 rural schools in Ubon Ratchthani province. Serum selenium (n=515) was analyzed by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and dietary selenium intake by Hydride Generation Absorption Spectrophotometry from one-day duplicate diet composites, from 80 (40 females; 40 males) randomly selected children. Inter-relationships between serum selenium and selenium intakes, and other biochemical micronutrient indices were also examined. Mean (SD) serum selenium was 1.46 (0.24) micro mol/L. Concentrations were not affected by infection or haemoglobinopathies, but were dependent on school (P< 0.001), sex (P=0.038), and age group (P=0.003), with serum zinc as a significant covariate. None of the children had serum selenium concentrations indicative of clinical selenium deficiency (i.e. <0.1 micro mol/L). Significant correlations existed between serum selenium and serum zinc (r= 0.216; P < 0.001), serum retinol (r = 0.273; P < 0.001), urinary iodine (r = -0.110; P = 0.014), haemoglobin (r = 0.298; P <0.001), and haematocrit (r = 0.303; P< 0.001). Mean (SD) dietary selenium intake was 46 (22) micro g/d. Children with low serum selenium concentrations had a lower mean selenium intake than those with high serum selenium concentrations (38 +/- 17 vs.51 +/- 24 micro g/d; P< 0.010). In conclusion, there appears to be no risk of selenium deficiency among these northeast Thai children. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17077062/Primary_school_children_from_northeast_Thailand_are_not_at_risk_of_selenium_deficiency_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/15/4/474.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -