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Association between health care providers' influence on parents who have concerns about vaccine safety and vaccination coverage.
Pediatrics. 2006 Nov; 118(5):e1287-92.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Parents who have concerns about vaccine safety may be reluctant to have their children vaccinated. The purpose of this study was to explore how vaccination coverage among children 19 to 35 months of age is associated with health care providers' influence on parents' decision to vaccinate their children, and with parents' beliefs about vaccine safety.

METHODS

Parents of 7695 children 19 to 35 months of age sampled by the National Immunization Survey were administered the National Immunization Survey Parental Knowledge Module between the third quarter of 2001 and the fourth quarter of 2002. Health care providers were defined as a physician, nurse, or any other type of health care professional. Parents provided responses that summarized the degree to which they believed vaccines were safe, and the influence providers had on their decisions to vaccinate their children. Children were determined to be up-to-date if their vaccination providers reported administering > or = 4 doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine, > or = 3 doses of polio vaccine, > or = 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, > or = 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, and > or = 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine.

RESULTS

Of all of the parents, 5.7% thought that vaccines were not safe, and 21.5% said that their decision to vaccinate their children was not influenced by a health care provider. Compared with parents who responded that providers were not influential in their decision to vaccinate their children, parents who responded that providers were influential were twice as likely to respond that vaccines were safe for children. Among children whose parents believed that vaccines were not safe, those whose parents' decision to vaccinate was influenced by a health care provider had an estimated vaccination coverage rate that was significantly higher than the estimated coverage rate among children whose parents' decision was not influenced by a health care provider (74.4% vs 50.3%; estimated difference: 24.1%).

CONCLUSIONS

Health care providers have a positive influence on parents to vaccinate their children, including parents who believe that vaccinations are unsafe. Physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals should increase their efforts to build honest and respectful relationships with parents, especially when parents express concerns about vaccine safety or have misconceptions about the benefits and risks of vaccinations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, National Immunization Program, MS E-32, 1600 Clifton Rd, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. pzs6@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17079529

Citation

Smith, Philip J., et al. "Association Between Health Care Providers' Influence On Parents Who Have Concerns About Vaccine Safety and Vaccination Coverage." Pediatrics, vol. 118, no. 5, 2006, pp. e1287-92.
Smith PJ, Kennedy AM, Wooten K, et al. Association between health care providers' influence on parents who have concerns about vaccine safety and vaccination coverage. Pediatrics. 2006;118(5):e1287-92.
Smith, P. J., Kennedy, A. M., Wooten, K., Gust, D. A., & Pickering, L. K. (2006). Association between health care providers' influence on parents who have concerns about vaccine safety and vaccination coverage. Pediatrics, 118(5), e1287-92.
Smith PJ, et al. Association Between Health Care Providers' Influence On Parents Who Have Concerns About Vaccine Safety and Vaccination Coverage. Pediatrics. 2006;118(5):e1287-92. PubMed PMID: 17079529.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between health care providers' influence on parents who have concerns about vaccine safety and vaccination coverage. AU - Smith,Philip J, AU - Kennedy,Allison M, AU - Wooten,Karen, AU - Gust,Deborah A, AU - Pickering,Larry K, PY - 2006/11/3/pubmed PY - 2006/11/15/medline PY - 2006/11/3/entrez SP - e1287 EP - 92 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 118 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Parents who have concerns about vaccine safety may be reluctant to have their children vaccinated. The purpose of this study was to explore how vaccination coverage among children 19 to 35 months of age is associated with health care providers' influence on parents' decision to vaccinate their children, and with parents' beliefs about vaccine safety. METHODS: Parents of 7695 children 19 to 35 months of age sampled by the National Immunization Survey were administered the National Immunization Survey Parental Knowledge Module between the third quarter of 2001 and the fourth quarter of 2002. Health care providers were defined as a physician, nurse, or any other type of health care professional. Parents provided responses that summarized the degree to which they believed vaccines were safe, and the influence providers had on their decisions to vaccinate their children. Children were determined to be up-to-date if their vaccination providers reported administering > or = 4 doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine, > or = 3 doses of polio vaccine, > or = 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, > or = 3 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, and > or = 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine. RESULTS: Of all of the parents, 5.7% thought that vaccines were not safe, and 21.5% said that their decision to vaccinate their children was not influenced by a health care provider. Compared with parents who responded that providers were not influential in their decision to vaccinate their children, parents who responded that providers were influential were twice as likely to respond that vaccines were safe for children. Among children whose parents believed that vaccines were not safe, those whose parents' decision to vaccinate was influenced by a health care provider had an estimated vaccination coverage rate that was significantly higher than the estimated coverage rate among children whose parents' decision was not influenced by a health care provider (74.4% vs 50.3%; estimated difference: 24.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers have a positive influence on parents to vaccinate their children, including parents who believe that vaccinations are unsafe. Physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals should increase their efforts to build honest and respectful relationships with parents, especially when parents express concerns about vaccine safety or have misconceptions about the benefits and risks of vaccinations. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17079529/Association_between_health_care_providers'_influence_on_parents_who_have_concerns_about_vaccine_safety_and_vaccination_coverage_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17079529 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -