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Does biofuel smoke contribute to anaemia and stunting in early childhood?
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb; 36(1):117-29.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reliance on biomass fuels for cooking and heating exposes many women and young children in developing countries to high levels of air pollution indoors. Exposure to biomass smoke has been linked to reduced birth weight, acute respiratory infections, and childhood mortality. This study examines the association between household use of biofuels (wood, dung, and crop residues) for cooking and heating and prevalence of anaemia and stunting in children.

METHODS

Data are from a 1998-99 national family health survey in India, which measured height, weight, and blood haemoglobin of 29 768 children aged 0-35 months in 92 486 households. Multinomial logistic regression is used to estimate the effects of biofuel use on prevalence of anaemia and stunting, controlling for exposure to tobacco smoke, recent episodes of illness, maternal education and nutrition, and other potentially confounding factors.

RESULTS

Analysis shows that prevalence of moderate-to-severe anaemia was significantly higher among children in households using biofuels than among children in households using cleaner fuels (RRR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.28, 1.94), independent of other factors. Prevalence of severe stunting was also significantly higher among children in biofuel-using households (RRR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.44, 2.36). Thirty-one per cent of moderate-to-severe anaemia and 37% of severe stunting among children aged 6-35 months in India may be attributable to exposure to biofuel smoke. Effects on mild anaemia and moderate stunting were smaller, but positive and statistically significant. Effects of exposure to tobacco smoke on anaemia and stunting were small and not significant.

CONCLUSIONS

The study provides a first evidence of the strong association between biofuel use and risks of anaemia and stunting in children, suggesting that exposure to biofuel smoke may contribute to chronic nutritional deficiencies in young children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ORC Macro, 11785 Beltsville Drive, Calverton, MD 20705, USA. vinod.mishra@orcmacro.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17085456

Citation

Mishra, Vinod, and Robert D. Retherford. "Does Biofuel Smoke Contribute to Anaemia and Stunting in Early Childhood?" International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 36, no. 1, 2007, pp. 117-29.
Mishra V, Retherford RD. Does biofuel smoke contribute to anaemia and stunting in early childhood? Int J Epidemiol. 2007;36(1):117-29.
Mishra, V., & Retherford, R. D. (2007). Does biofuel smoke contribute to anaemia and stunting in early childhood? International Journal of Epidemiology, 36(1), 117-29.
Mishra V, Retherford RD. Does Biofuel Smoke Contribute to Anaemia and Stunting in Early Childhood. Int J Epidemiol. 2007;36(1):117-29. PubMed PMID: 17085456.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does biofuel smoke contribute to anaemia and stunting in early childhood? AU - Mishra,Vinod, AU - Retherford,Robert D, Y1 - 2006/11/03/ PY - 2006/11/7/pubmed PY - 2007/7/31/medline PY - 2006/11/7/entrez SP - 117 EP - 29 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reliance on biomass fuels for cooking and heating exposes many women and young children in developing countries to high levels of air pollution indoors. Exposure to biomass smoke has been linked to reduced birth weight, acute respiratory infections, and childhood mortality. This study examines the association between household use of biofuels (wood, dung, and crop residues) for cooking and heating and prevalence of anaemia and stunting in children. METHODS: Data are from a 1998-99 national family health survey in India, which measured height, weight, and blood haemoglobin of 29 768 children aged 0-35 months in 92 486 households. Multinomial logistic regression is used to estimate the effects of biofuel use on prevalence of anaemia and stunting, controlling for exposure to tobacco smoke, recent episodes of illness, maternal education and nutrition, and other potentially confounding factors. RESULTS: Analysis shows that prevalence of moderate-to-severe anaemia was significantly higher among children in households using biofuels than among children in households using cleaner fuels (RRR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.28, 1.94), independent of other factors. Prevalence of severe stunting was also significantly higher among children in biofuel-using households (RRR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.44, 2.36). Thirty-one per cent of moderate-to-severe anaemia and 37% of severe stunting among children aged 6-35 months in India may be attributable to exposure to biofuel smoke. Effects on mild anaemia and moderate stunting were smaller, but positive and statistically significant. Effects of exposure to tobacco smoke on anaemia and stunting were small and not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides a first evidence of the strong association between biofuel use and risks of anaemia and stunting in children, suggesting that exposure to biofuel smoke may contribute to chronic nutritional deficiencies in young children. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17085456/Does_biofuel_smoke_contribute_to_anaemia_and_stunting_in_early_childhood L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyl234 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -