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Alcohol intake and its relationship with bone mineral density, falls, and fracture risk in older men.
J Am Geriatr Soc 2006; 54(11):1649-57JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association between alcohol intake and problem drinking history and bone mineral density (BMD), falls and fracture risk.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Six U.S. clinical centers.

PARTICIPANTS

Five thousand nine hundred seventy-four men aged 65 and older.

MEASUREMENTS

Alcohol intake and problem drinking histories were ascertained at baseline. Follow-up time was 1 year for falls and a mean of 3.65 years for fractures.

RESULTS

Two thousand one hundred twenty-one participants (35.5%) reported limited alcohol intake (<12 drinks/y); 3,156 (52.8%) reported light intake (<14 drinks/wk), and 697 (11.7%) reported moderate to heavy intake (> or =14 drinks/wk) in the year before baseline. One thousand one men (16.8%) had ever had problem drinking. In multivariate models, as alcohol intake increased, so did hip and spine BMD (P for trend < .001). Greater alcohol intake was not associated with greater risk for nonspine or hip fractures. Men with light intake, but not moderate to heavy intake, had a lower risk of two or more incident falls (light intake: relative risk (RR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.92; moderate to heavy intake: RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.63-1.10) than abstainers. Men with problem drinking had higher femoral neck (+1.3%) and spine BMD (+1.4%), and a higher risk of two or more falls (RR = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.30-1.94) than those without a history of problem drinking and similar total hip BMD and risk of fracture.

CONCLUSION

In older men, recent alcohol intake is associated with higher BMD. Alcohol intake and fracture risk is unclear. Light alcohol intake may decrease the risk of falling, but a history of problem drinking increased fall risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Institute, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94107, USA. pcawthon@sfcc-cpmc.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17087690

Citation

Cawthon, Peggy M., et al. "Alcohol Intake and Its Relationship With Bone Mineral Density, Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Men." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 54, no. 11, 2006, pp. 1649-57.
Cawthon PM, Harrison SL, Barrett-Connor E, et al. Alcohol intake and its relationship with bone mineral density, falls, and fracture risk in older men. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006;54(11):1649-57.
Cawthon, P. M., Harrison, S. L., Barrett-Connor, E., Fink, H. A., Cauley, J. A., Lewis, C. E., ... Cummings, S. R. (2006). Alcohol intake and its relationship with bone mineral density, falls, and fracture risk in older men. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 54(11), pp. 1649-57.
Cawthon PM, et al. Alcohol Intake and Its Relationship With Bone Mineral Density, Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Men. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006;54(11):1649-57. PubMed PMID: 17087690.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol intake and its relationship with bone mineral density, falls, and fracture risk in older men. AU - Cawthon,Peggy M, AU - Harrison,Stephanie L, AU - Barrett-Connor,Elizabeth, AU - Fink,Howard A, AU - Cauley,Jane A, AU - Lewis,Cora E, AU - Orwoll,Eric S, AU - Cummings,Steven R, PY - 2006/11/8/pubmed PY - 2006/12/22/medline PY - 2006/11/8/entrez SP - 1649 EP - 57 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 54 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between alcohol intake and problem drinking history and bone mineral density (BMD), falls and fracture risk. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study. SETTING: Six U.S. clinical centers. PARTICIPANTS: Five thousand nine hundred seventy-four men aged 65 and older. MEASUREMENTS: Alcohol intake and problem drinking histories were ascertained at baseline. Follow-up time was 1 year for falls and a mean of 3.65 years for fractures. RESULTS: Two thousand one hundred twenty-one participants (35.5%) reported limited alcohol intake (<12 drinks/y); 3,156 (52.8%) reported light intake (<14 drinks/wk), and 697 (11.7%) reported moderate to heavy intake (> or =14 drinks/wk) in the year before baseline. One thousand one men (16.8%) had ever had problem drinking. In multivariate models, as alcohol intake increased, so did hip and spine BMD (P for trend < .001). Greater alcohol intake was not associated with greater risk for nonspine or hip fractures. Men with light intake, but not moderate to heavy intake, had a lower risk of two or more incident falls (light intake: relative risk (RR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.92; moderate to heavy intake: RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.63-1.10) than abstainers. Men with problem drinking had higher femoral neck (+1.3%) and spine BMD (+1.4%), and a higher risk of two or more falls (RR = 1.59; 95% CI = 1.30-1.94) than those without a history of problem drinking and similar total hip BMD and risk of fracture. CONCLUSION: In older men, recent alcohol intake is associated with higher BMD. Alcohol intake and fracture risk is unclear. Light alcohol intake may decrease the risk of falling, but a history of problem drinking increased fall risk. SN - 0002-8614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17087690/Alcohol_intake_and_its_relationship_with_bone_mineral_density_falls_and_fracture_risk_in_older_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2006.00912.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -