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Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence.
Am J Clin Nutr 2006; 84(5):1043-54AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational evidence suggests that having been breastfed in infancy may reduce the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in later life.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to examine the influence of initial breastfeeding on type 2 diabetes and blood glucose and insulin concentrations.

DESIGN

A systematic review of published studies identified 1010 reports; 23 examined the relation between infant feeding and type 2 diabetes in later life or risk factors for diabetes. Risk factors in infants were examined separately from those in children and adults. All estimates were pooled by using fixed-effect models; differences <0 and ratios <1 imply a beneficial effect of breastfeeding.

RESULTS

Subjects who were breastfed had a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in later life than did those who were formula fed (7 studies; 76 744 subjects; odds ratio: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.85; P = 0.003). Children and adults without diabetes who had been breastfed had marginally lower fasting insulin concentrations than did those who were formula fed (6 studies; 4800 subjects; percentage difference: -3%; 95% CI: -8%, 1%; P = 0.13); no significant difference in fasting glucose concentrations was observed. Breastfed infants had lower mean preprandial blood glucose (12 studies; 560 subjects; mean difference: -0.17 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.28, -0.05 mmol/L; P = 0.005) and insulin (7 studies; 291 subjects; mean difference: -2.86 pmol/L; 95% CI: -5.76, 0.04 pmol/L; P = 0.054) concentrations than did those who were formula fed.

CONCLUSION

Breastfeeding in infancy is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, with marginally lower insulin concentrations in later life, and with lower blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in infancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Community Health Sciences, St George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom. cowen@sgul.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17093156

Citation

Owen, Christopher G., et al. "Does Breastfeeding Influence Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Later Life? a Quantitative Analysis of Published Evidence." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 5, 2006, pp. 1043-54.
Owen CG, Martin RM, Whincup PH, et al. Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;84(5):1043-54.
Owen, C. G., Martin, R. M., Whincup, P. H., Smith, G. D., & Cook, D. G. (2006). Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 84(5), pp. 1043-54.
Owen CG, et al. Does Breastfeeding Influence Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Later Life? a Quantitative Analysis of Published Evidence. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;84(5):1043-54. PubMed PMID: 17093156.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence. AU - Owen,Christopher G, AU - Martin,Richard M, AU - Whincup,Peter H, AU - Smith,George Davey, AU - Cook,Derek G, PY - 2006/11/10/pubmed PY - 2006/12/15/medline PY - 2006/11/10/entrez SP - 1043 EP - 54 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 84 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational evidence suggests that having been breastfed in infancy may reduce the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in later life. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the influence of initial breastfeeding on type 2 diabetes and blood glucose and insulin concentrations. DESIGN: A systematic review of published studies identified 1010 reports; 23 examined the relation between infant feeding and type 2 diabetes in later life or risk factors for diabetes. Risk factors in infants were examined separately from those in children and adults. All estimates were pooled by using fixed-effect models; differences <0 and ratios <1 imply a beneficial effect of breastfeeding. RESULTS: Subjects who were breastfed had a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in later life than did those who were formula fed (7 studies; 76 744 subjects; odds ratio: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.85; P = 0.003). Children and adults without diabetes who had been breastfed had marginally lower fasting insulin concentrations than did those who were formula fed (6 studies; 4800 subjects; percentage difference: -3%; 95% CI: -8%, 1%; P = 0.13); no significant difference in fasting glucose concentrations was observed. Breastfed infants had lower mean preprandial blood glucose (12 studies; 560 subjects; mean difference: -0.17 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.28, -0.05 mmol/L; P = 0.005) and insulin (7 studies; 291 subjects; mean difference: -2.86 pmol/L; 95% CI: -5.76, 0.04 pmol/L; P = 0.054) concentrations than did those who were formula fed. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding in infancy is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, with marginally lower insulin concentrations in later life, and with lower blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in infancy. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17093156/Does_breastfeeding_influence_risk_of_type_2_diabetes_in_later_life_A_quantitative_analysis_of_published_evidence_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/84.5.1043 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -