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Gamma glutamyl transferase and metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality risk: the Framingham Heart Study.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2007; 27(1):127-33AT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, accounting for temporal changes in known CVD risk factors and C-reactive protein (CRP).

METHODS AND RESULTS

In 3451 Framingham Study participants (mean age 44 years, 52% women) we examined the relations of GGT with CVD risk factors, and prospectively determined the risk of new-onset metabolic syndrome, incident CVD, and death. GGT was positively associated with body mass index, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood glucose in cross-sectional analysis (P<0.005). On follow-up (mean 19 years), 968 participants developed metabolic syndrome, 535 developed incident CVD, and 362 died. The risk of metabolic syndrome increased with higher GGT (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per SD increment log-GGT, 1.26 [95%CI; 1.18 to 1.35]). Adjusting for established CVD risk factors (as time-dependent covariates updated quadriennially) and baseline CRP, a 1-SD increase in log-GGT conferred a 13% increase in CVD risk (P=0.007) and 26% increased risk of death (P<0.001). Individuals in the highest GGT quartile experienced a 67% increase in CVD incidence (multivariable-adjusted HR 1.67, 95%CI; 1.25 to 2.22).

CONCLUSIONS

An increase in serum GGT predicts onset of metabolic syndrome, incident CVD, and death suggesting that GGT is a marker of metabolic and cardiovascular risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Division of Cardiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Rm G-106, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 Canada. dlee@ices.on.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17095717

Citation

Lee, Douglas S., et al. "Gamma Glutamyl Transferase and Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiovascular Disease, and Mortality Risk: the Framingham Heart Study." Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 27, no. 1, 2007, pp. 127-33.
Lee DS, Evans JC, Robins SJ, et al. Gamma glutamyl transferase and metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality risk: the Framingham Heart Study. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007;27(1):127-33.
Lee, D. S., Evans, J. C., Robins, S. J., Wilson, P. W., Albano, I., Fox, C. S., ... Vasan, R. S. (2007). Gamma glutamyl transferase and metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality risk: the Framingham Heart Study. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 27(1), pp. 127-33.
Lee DS, et al. Gamma Glutamyl Transferase and Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiovascular Disease, and Mortality Risk: the Framingham Heart Study. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007;27(1):127-33. PubMed PMID: 17095717.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gamma glutamyl transferase and metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality risk: the Framingham Heart Study. AU - Lee,Douglas S, AU - Evans,Jane C, AU - Robins,Sander J, AU - Wilson,Peter W, AU - Albano,Irene, AU - Fox,Caroline S, AU - Wang,Thomas J, AU - Benjamin,Emelia J, AU - D'Agostino,Ralph B, AU - Vasan,Ramachandran S, Y1 - 2006/11/09/ PY - 2006/11/11/pubmed PY - 2007/1/24/medline PY - 2006/11/11/entrez SP - 127 EP - 33 JF - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology JO - Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, accounting for temporal changes in known CVD risk factors and C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 3451 Framingham Study participants (mean age 44 years, 52% women) we examined the relations of GGT with CVD risk factors, and prospectively determined the risk of new-onset metabolic syndrome, incident CVD, and death. GGT was positively associated with body mass index, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood glucose in cross-sectional analysis (P<0.005). On follow-up (mean 19 years), 968 participants developed metabolic syndrome, 535 developed incident CVD, and 362 died. The risk of metabolic syndrome increased with higher GGT (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per SD increment log-GGT, 1.26 [95%CI; 1.18 to 1.35]). Adjusting for established CVD risk factors (as time-dependent covariates updated quadriennially) and baseline CRP, a 1-SD increase in log-GGT conferred a 13% increase in CVD risk (P=0.007) and 26% increased risk of death (P<0.001). Individuals in the highest GGT quartile experienced a 67% increase in CVD incidence (multivariable-adjusted HR 1.67, 95%CI; 1.25 to 2.22). CONCLUSIONS: An increase in serum GGT predicts onset of metabolic syndrome, incident CVD, and death suggesting that GGT is a marker of metabolic and cardiovascular risk. SN - 1524-4636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17095717/Gamma_glutamyl_transferase_and_metabolic_syndrome_cardiovascular_disease_and_mortality_risk:_the_Framingham_Heart_Study_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.ATV.0000251993.20372.40?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -