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Attitude of kidney patients on the transplant waiting list toward related-living donation. A reason for the scarce development of living donation in Spain.
Clin Transplant. 2006 Nov-Dec; 20(6):719-24.CT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Most Spanish transplant centers have on-going living kidney transplant programs. However, such transplants are not increasing as a proportion of the total number of kidney transplants. The objective of this study is to analyze the attitude of kidney patients on the kidney transplant waiting list toward living kidney donation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The patients studied were selected from those included on the kidney transplant waiting list from November 2003 until September 2005 (n = 221). Attitude toward living donation was evaluated using a psychosocial questionnaire. It was completed in a direct personal interview with an independent health-care worker from the Transplant Unit. Student's t-test and the chi-squared test were applied.

RESULTS

Two hundred and fourteen patients completed the questionnaire (97%), of which 35% would accept a related living kidney if it were offered to them, 60% would prefer to wait on the waiting list and the remaining 5% are undecided. Up to 66% (n = 134) of patients report that a member of their family or a friend have offered them an organ for donation. Eighty-nine percentage believe that there is some risk involved in living kidney donation, although it is not a factor that affects whether an organ would be accepted or not (p = 0.767). The psychosocial variables that affect attitude toward accepting a related living kidney are: (i) age: the youngest are those who are most likely to accept (40 vs. 45-yr-old; p = 0.010); (ii) descendents: patients without descendents are more likely to accept a living organ (56% vs. 27%; p < 0.000); (iii) marital status: a greater percentage of single respondents would be prepared to receive this type of transplant compared to the group of married respondents (55% vs. 30%. p = 0.007); and (iv) level of education: those with a higher level of education are more likely to accept a living organ (43% have secondary or university studies vs. 28% who only have primary education; p = 0.040).

CONCLUSION

Patients on the waiting list for a kidney transplant do not have a very favorable attitude toward receiving a related-living donor organ, although members of their family have offered them one of their organs. The profile of a patient who would accept a related-living donated kidney is a young, single person, without descendents, and with a high level of education.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servicio de Cirugía, Unidad de Trasplantes, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, El Palmar, Murcia, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17100721

Citation

Martínez-Alarcón, L, et al. "Attitude of Kidney Patients On the Transplant Waiting List Toward Related-living Donation. a Reason for the Scarce Development of Living Donation in Spain." Clinical Transplantation, vol. 20, no. 6, 2006, pp. 719-24.
Martínez-Alarcón L, Ríos A, Conesa C, et al. Attitude of kidney patients on the transplant waiting list toward related-living donation. A reason for the scarce development of living donation in Spain. Clin Transplant. 2006;20(6):719-24.
Martínez-Alarcón, L., Ríos, A., Conesa, C., Alcaraz, J., González, M. J., Ramírez, P., & Parrilla, P. (2006). Attitude of kidney patients on the transplant waiting list toward related-living donation. A reason for the scarce development of living donation in Spain. Clinical Transplantation, 20(6), 719-24.
Martínez-Alarcón L, et al. Attitude of Kidney Patients On the Transplant Waiting List Toward Related-living Donation. a Reason for the Scarce Development of Living Donation in Spain. Clin Transplant. 2006 Nov-Dec;20(6):719-24. PubMed PMID: 17100721.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attitude of kidney patients on the transplant waiting list toward related-living donation. A reason for the scarce development of living donation in Spain. AU - Martínez-Alarcón,L, AU - Ríos,A, AU - Conesa,C, AU - Alcaraz,J, AU - González,M J, AU - Ramírez,P, AU - Parrilla,P, PY - 2006/11/15/pubmed PY - 2007/2/3/medline PY - 2006/11/15/entrez SP - 719 EP - 24 JF - Clinical transplantation JO - Clin Transplant VL - 20 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Most Spanish transplant centers have on-going living kidney transplant programs. However, such transplants are not increasing as a proportion of the total number of kidney transplants. The objective of this study is to analyze the attitude of kidney patients on the kidney transplant waiting list toward living kidney donation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The patients studied were selected from those included on the kidney transplant waiting list from November 2003 until September 2005 (n = 221). Attitude toward living donation was evaluated using a psychosocial questionnaire. It was completed in a direct personal interview with an independent health-care worker from the Transplant Unit. Student's t-test and the chi-squared test were applied. RESULTS: Two hundred and fourteen patients completed the questionnaire (97%), of which 35% would accept a related living kidney if it were offered to them, 60% would prefer to wait on the waiting list and the remaining 5% are undecided. Up to 66% (n = 134) of patients report that a member of their family or a friend have offered them an organ for donation. Eighty-nine percentage believe that there is some risk involved in living kidney donation, although it is not a factor that affects whether an organ would be accepted or not (p = 0.767). The psychosocial variables that affect attitude toward accepting a related living kidney are: (i) age: the youngest are those who are most likely to accept (40 vs. 45-yr-old; p = 0.010); (ii) descendents: patients without descendents are more likely to accept a living organ (56% vs. 27%; p < 0.000); (iii) marital status: a greater percentage of single respondents would be prepared to receive this type of transplant compared to the group of married respondents (55% vs. 30%. p = 0.007); and (iv) level of education: those with a higher level of education are more likely to accept a living organ (43% have secondary or university studies vs. 28% who only have primary education; p = 0.040). CONCLUSION: Patients on the waiting list for a kidney transplant do not have a very favorable attitude toward receiving a related-living donor organ, although members of their family have offered them one of their organs. The profile of a patient who would accept a related-living donated kidney is a young, single person, without descendents, and with a high level of education. SN - 0902-0063 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17100721/Attitude_of_kidney_patients_on_the_transplant_waiting_list_toward_related_living_donation__A_reason_for_the_scarce_development_of_living_donation_in_Spain_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -