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The contact hypothesis revisited: status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon.
Psychol Sci. 2006 Oct; 17(10):862-8.PS

Abstract

Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice-between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2)-we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact.

Authors+Show Affiliations

DePaul University. Department of Psychology, DePaul University, 2219 N. Kenmore Ave., Chicago, IL 60614-3504, USA. phenry1@depaul.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17100786

Citation

Henry, P J., and Curtis D. Hardin. "The Contact Hypothesis Revisited: Status Bias in the Reduction of Implicit Prejudice in the United States and Lebanon." Psychological Science, vol. 17, no. 10, 2006, pp. 862-8.
Henry PJ, Hardin CD. The contact hypothesis revisited: status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. Psychol Sci. 2006;17(10):862-8.
Henry, P. J., & Hardin, C. D. (2006). The contact hypothesis revisited: status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. Psychological Science, 17(10), 862-8.
Henry PJ, Hardin CD. The Contact Hypothesis Revisited: Status Bias in the Reduction of Implicit Prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. Psychol Sci. 2006;17(10):862-8. PubMed PMID: 17100786.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The contact hypothesis revisited: status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. AU - Henry,P J, AU - Hardin,Curtis D, PY - 2006/11/15/pubmed PY - 2007/2/13/medline PY - 2006/11/15/entrez SP - 862 EP - 8 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 17 IS - 10 N2 - Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice-between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2)-we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. SN - 0956-7976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17100786/The_contact_hypothesis_revisited:_status_bias_in_the_reduction_of_implicit_prejudice_in_the_United_States_and_Lebanon_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01795.x?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -