Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nine-year changes in intraocular pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe temporal changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) and associated risk factors after 9 years of follow-up in a population of African descent.

METHODS

Changes in IOP were evaluated in 2298 participants without glaucoma or IOP-lowering treatment at baseline. Risk factor analyses used a multiple regression approach with mixed effects, which accounted for intereye correlation.

RESULTS

The mean 9-year change in IOP was small, with relatively large dispersion (mean +/- SD, 0.4 +/- 4.0 mm Hg). Only 6.5% of persons with IOP of 21 mm Hg or less at baseline had elevated IOP greater than 21 mm Hg after 9 years. Mean IOP increases were largest in persons aged 50 to 59 years at baseline (mean +/- SD, 0.9 +/- 4.3 mm Hg), whereas IOP decreased in persons 70 years or older (mean +/- SD, -0.6 +/- 4.2 mm Hg). In multivariate analyses, IOP changes were positively associated with male sex, hypertension, diabetes history, and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure at baseline, as well as with increases in blood pressure throughout 9 years (P<.05).

CONCLUSIONS

After long-term follow-up, minimal changes in IOP were observed in this African-origin population. The consistent relationships of hypertension and diabetes to IOP, a major glaucoma risk factor, underscore the public health importance of controlling these systemic conditions in black populations, where glaucoma incidence is high.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8036, USA. swu@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    African Continental Ancestry Group
    Aged
    Barbados
    Blood Pressure
    Diabetes Complications
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Glaucoma, Open-Angle
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Incidence
    Intraocular Pressure
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Ocular Hypertension
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17102013

    Citation

    Wu, Sun-Yuh, et al. "Nine-year Changes in Intraocular Pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies." Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), vol. 124, no. 11, 2006, pp. 1631-6.
    Wu SY, Nemesure B, Hennis A, et al. Nine-year changes in intraocular pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies. Arch Ophthalmol. 2006;124(11):1631-6.
    Wu, S. Y., Nemesure, B., Hennis, A., & Leske, M. C. (2006). Nine-year changes in intraocular pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies. Archives of Ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), 124(11), pp. 1631-6.
    Wu SY, et al. Nine-year Changes in Intraocular Pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies. Arch Ophthalmol. 2006;124(11):1631-6. PubMed PMID: 17102013.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Nine-year changes in intraocular pressure: the Barbados Eye Studies. AU - Wu,Sun-Yuh, AU - Nemesure,Barbara, AU - Hennis,Anselm, AU - Leske,M Cristina, AU - ,, PY - 2006/11/15/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/11/15/entrez SP - 1631 EP - 6 JF - Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago, Ill. : 1960) JO - Arch. Ophthalmol. VL - 124 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe temporal changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) and associated risk factors after 9 years of follow-up in a population of African descent. METHODS: Changes in IOP were evaluated in 2298 participants without glaucoma or IOP-lowering treatment at baseline. Risk factor analyses used a multiple regression approach with mixed effects, which accounted for intereye correlation. RESULTS: The mean 9-year change in IOP was small, with relatively large dispersion (mean +/- SD, 0.4 +/- 4.0 mm Hg). Only 6.5% of persons with IOP of 21 mm Hg or less at baseline had elevated IOP greater than 21 mm Hg after 9 years. Mean IOP increases were largest in persons aged 50 to 59 years at baseline (mean +/- SD, 0.9 +/- 4.3 mm Hg), whereas IOP decreased in persons 70 years or older (mean +/- SD, -0.6 +/- 4.2 mm Hg). In multivariate analyses, IOP changes were positively associated with male sex, hypertension, diabetes history, and higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure at baseline, as well as with increases in blood pressure throughout 9 years (P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: After long-term follow-up, minimal changes in IOP were observed in this African-origin population. The consistent relationships of hypertension and diabetes to IOP, a major glaucoma risk factor, underscore the public health importance of controlling these systemic conditions in black populations, where glaucoma incidence is high. SN - 0003-9950 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17102013/Nine_year_changes_in_intraocular_pressure:_the_Barbados_Eye_Studies_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/archopht.124.11.1631 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -