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Explaining school children's fruit and vegetable consumption: the contributions of availability, accessibility, exposure, parental consumption and habit in addition to psychosocial factors.
Appetite. 2007 Mar; 48(2):248-58.A

Abstract

We studied the contributions of parental fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption, availability and accessibility of F&V in the home, exposure to F&V, and habit, in addition to psychosocial factors, in explaining F&V consumption in 4-12-year-old children. Furthermore, we looked for effect modification by ethnicity and gender. Children's parents (n = 1739) completed a questionnaire assessing psychosocial and additional factors regarding their children's F&V consumption. Consumption was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire. The model explained the children's F&V consumption better when the additional factors were included (R2 = .49 and R2 = .50 for fruit consumption, and R2 = .33 and R2 = .33 for vegetable consumption). Stepwise multi-level regression analyses revealed that habit was the most influential correlate of F&V consumption. It is concluded that nutrition education interventions aimed at stimulating F&V consumption among children should take into account that the consumption of fruit and that of vegetables are clearly different behaviors, with different influencing factors for boys and girls and children of native or non-native background. Furthermore, interventions to increase F&V consumption should include strategies aimed at making these behaviors habitual.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Education and Promotion, Universiteit Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Evelien.Reinaerts@gvo.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17109996

Citation

Reinaerts, Evelien, et al. "Explaining School Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: the Contributions of Availability, Accessibility, Exposure, Parental Consumption and Habit in Addition to Psychosocial Factors." Appetite, vol. 48, no. 2, 2007, pp. 248-58.
Reinaerts E, de Nooijer J, Candel M, et al. Explaining school children's fruit and vegetable consumption: the contributions of availability, accessibility, exposure, parental consumption and habit in addition to psychosocial factors. Appetite. 2007;48(2):248-58.
Reinaerts, E., de Nooijer, J., Candel, M., & de Vries, N. (2007). Explaining school children's fruit and vegetable consumption: the contributions of availability, accessibility, exposure, parental consumption and habit in addition to psychosocial factors. Appetite, 48(2), 248-58.
Reinaerts E, et al. Explaining School Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: the Contributions of Availability, Accessibility, Exposure, Parental Consumption and Habit in Addition to Psychosocial Factors. Appetite. 2007;48(2):248-58. PubMed PMID: 17109996.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Explaining school children's fruit and vegetable consumption: the contributions of availability, accessibility, exposure, parental consumption and habit in addition to psychosocial factors. AU - Reinaerts,Evelien, AU - de Nooijer,Jascha, AU - Candel,Math, AU - de Vries,Nanne, Y1 - 2006/11/15/ PY - 2005/10/27/received PY - 2006/09/07/revised PY - 2006/09/26/accepted PY - 2006/11/18/pubmed PY - 2007/4/3/medline PY - 2006/11/18/entrez SP - 248 EP - 58 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 48 IS - 2 N2 - We studied the contributions of parental fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption, availability and accessibility of F&V in the home, exposure to F&V, and habit, in addition to psychosocial factors, in explaining F&V consumption in 4-12-year-old children. Furthermore, we looked for effect modification by ethnicity and gender. Children's parents (n = 1739) completed a questionnaire assessing psychosocial and additional factors regarding their children's F&V consumption. Consumption was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire. The model explained the children's F&V consumption better when the additional factors were included (R2 = .49 and R2 = .50 for fruit consumption, and R2 = .33 and R2 = .33 for vegetable consumption). Stepwise multi-level regression analyses revealed that habit was the most influential correlate of F&V consumption. It is concluded that nutrition education interventions aimed at stimulating F&V consumption among children should take into account that the consumption of fruit and that of vegetables are clearly different behaviors, with different influencing factors for boys and girls and children of native or non-native background. Furthermore, interventions to increase F&V consumption should include strategies aimed at making these behaviors habitual. SN - 0195-6663 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17109996/Explaining_school_children's_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption:_the_contributions_of_availability_accessibility_exposure_parental_consumption_and_habit_in_addition_to_psychosocial_factors_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(06)00608-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -