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[Feeding pattern of Rift Valley Fever virus vectors in Senegal. Implications in the disease epidemiology].
Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 2006 Oct; 99(4):283-9.BS

Abstract

During the rainy season 2003, an entomological survey was undertaken in the Sahelian bioclimatic zone of the Ferlo area in northern Senegal, in order to evaluate the degree of interaction between Rift valley fever (RVF) virus vectors and domestic animals and to determine the role of natural vertebrate hosts in the transmission and maintenance cycle. The study of vector-host contact was carried out under bed net traps using man, cow, sheep, chicken as bait whereas the RVFV vectors-vertebrate host interactions were studied through the analysis by an ELISA technique of the origin of the blood meals from naturally engorged females collected by aspiration. Blood meals sources were determined using a set of eight antibodies. Overall, the different known RVFV vectors (Culex poicilipes, Aedes vexans and Aedes ochraceus) were opportunistic although the bovine-baited net was, as far the more effective trap with 53.6% of collected mosquitoes. It was followed by the sheep-baited net (16.7%), man-baited net (12.6%) and chicken-baited net (11.6%). The more effectiveness of the bovine-baited net confirms the degree of implication of this host in RVF epidemiology. The study of vector-hosts interactions in nature showed that among the 1,112 mosquito blood meals tested, 701 were identified of which 693 were from Aedes vexans. The percentage of non-reacting blood meal was 36.7% whereas 16.9 % of the blood meals were taken at least on two vertebrate hosts. Overall, 53.2% of the blood meals from Ae. vexans were taken on equine, 18.6% on bovines, 7.1% on sheep and 0.6% on human. No blood meal was taken on rodent. The greatest diversity was observed in August. These host feedings patterns show that although equine is known to play a minor role in RVF epidemiology a thorough attention should be made to this host with regard to the percentage of blood meals taken in this host. The low percentage of blood meals taken on human could probably explain the low human infection rate observed up to now in Senegal. With the high percentage of non-reacting blood meals, our results also underline the necessity of an improvement of ELISA techniques and the use of more reliable tools as molecular markers for an exhaustive identification of vertebrates hosts involved in RVF epidemiological cycle.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratoire d'entomologie médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, BP 220 Dakar, Sénégal. ba@pasteur.snNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

17111980

Citation

Ba, Y, et al. "[Feeding Pattern of Rift Valley Fever Virus Vectors in Senegal. Implications in the Disease Epidemiology]." Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), vol. 99, no. 4, 2006, pp. 283-9.
Ba Y, Diallo D, Dia I, et al. [Feeding pattern of Rift Valley Fever virus vectors in Senegal. Implications in the disease epidemiology]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 2006;99(4):283-9.
Ba, Y., Diallo, D., Dia, I., & Diallo, M. (2006). [Feeding pattern of Rift Valley Fever virus vectors in Senegal. Implications in the disease epidemiology]. Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), 99(4), 283-9.
Ba Y, et al. [Feeding Pattern of Rift Valley Fever Virus Vectors in Senegal. Implications in the Disease Epidemiology]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 2006;99(4):283-9. PubMed PMID: 17111980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Feeding pattern of Rift Valley Fever virus vectors in Senegal. Implications in the disease epidemiology]. AU - Ba,Y, AU - Diallo,D, AU - Dia,I, AU - Diallo,M, PY - 2006/11/23/pubmed PY - 2007/2/23/medline PY - 2006/11/23/entrez SP - 283 EP - 9 JF - Bulletin de la Societe de pathologie exotique (1990) JO - Bull Soc Pathol Exot VL - 99 IS - 4 N2 - During the rainy season 2003, an entomological survey was undertaken in the Sahelian bioclimatic zone of the Ferlo area in northern Senegal, in order to evaluate the degree of interaction between Rift valley fever (RVF) virus vectors and domestic animals and to determine the role of natural vertebrate hosts in the transmission and maintenance cycle. The study of vector-host contact was carried out under bed net traps using man, cow, sheep, chicken as bait whereas the RVFV vectors-vertebrate host interactions were studied through the analysis by an ELISA technique of the origin of the blood meals from naturally engorged females collected by aspiration. Blood meals sources were determined using a set of eight antibodies. Overall, the different known RVFV vectors (Culex poicilipes, Aedes vexans and Aedes ochraceus) were opportunistic although the bovine-baited net was, as far the more effective trap with 53.6% of collected mosquitoes. It was followed by the sheep-baited net (16.7%), man-baited net (12.6%) and chicken-baited net (11.6%). The more effectiveness of the bovine-baited net confirms the degree of implication of this host in RVF epidemiology. The study of vector-hosts interactions in nature showed that among the 1,112 mosquito blood meals tested, 701 were identified of which 693 were from Aedes vexans. The percentage of non-reacting blood meal was 36.7% whereas 16.9 % of the blood meals were taken at least on two vertebrate hosts. Overall, 53.2% of the blood meals from Ae. vexans were taken on equine, 18.6% on bovines, 7.1% on sheep and 0.6% on human. No blood meal was taken on rodent. The greatest diversity was observed in August. These host feedings patterns show that although equine is known to play a minor role in RVF epidemiology a thorough attention should be made to this host with regard to the percentage of blood meals taken in this host. The low percentage of blood meals taken on human could probably explain the low human infection rate observed up to now in Senegal. With the high percentage of non-reacting blood meals, our results also underline the necessity of an improvement of ELISA techniques and the use of more reliable tools as molecular markers for an exhaustive identification of vertebrates hosts involved in RVF epidemiological cycle. SN - 0037-9085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17111980/[Feeding_pattern_of_Rift_Valley_Fever_virus_vectors_in_Senegal__Implications_in_the_disease_epidemiology]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -