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Biodegradation of high-toughness double network hydrogels as potential materials for artificial cartilage.

Abstract

This study evaluated biodegradation properties of four novel high-toughness double network (DN) hydrogels as potential materials for artificial cartilage. Concerning each DN gel material, a total of 12 specimens were prepared, and 6 of the 12 specimens were examined to determine the mechanical properties without any treatments. The remaining 6 specimens were implanted into the subcutaneous tissue, using 6 mature female rabbits. At 6 weeks after implantation, the mechanical properties and the water content of the implanted specimens were measured. In the poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl-propane sulfonic acid)/poly(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel, the ultimate stress and the tangent modulus were significantly increased from 3.10 and 0.20 MPa, respectively, to 5.40 and 0.37 MPa, respectively, with a significant reduction of the water content after implantation (94 to 91%). In the poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl-propane sulfonic acid)/polyacrylamide DN gel and the cellulose/poly(dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel, the stress (11.4 and 1.90 MPa, respectively) and the modulus (0.30 and 1.70 MPa, respectively) or the water content rarely changed after implantation (90 and 85%, respectively). In the bacterial cellulose/gelatin DN gel, the ultimate stress was dramatically reduced from 4.30 to 1.98 MPa with a significant increase of the water content after implantation (78 to 86%). This study implied that these DN gels except for the cellulose/gelatin DN gel are potential materials that may meet the requirements of artificial cartilage.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Sports Medicine and Joint Reconstruction Surgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan.

    , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Absorbable Implants
    Animals
    Biomechanical Phenomena
    Cartilage
    Female
    Hydrogels
    Materials Testing
    Prostheses and Implants
    Rabbits

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17117467

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Biodegradation of high-toughness double network hydrogels as potential materials for artificial cartilage. AU - Azuma,Chinatsu, AU - Yasuda,Kazunori, AU - Tanabe,Yoshie, AU - Taniguro,Hiroko, AU - Kanaya,Fuminori, AU - Nakayama,Atsushi, AU - Chen,Yong Mei, AU - Gong,Jian Ping, AU - Osada,Yoshihito, PY - 2006/11/23/pubmed PY - 2007/7/12/medline PY - 2006/11/23/entrez SP - 373 EP - 80 JF - Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A JO - J Biomed Mater Res A VL - 81 IS - 2 N2 - This study evaluated biodegradation properties of four novel high-toughness double network (DN) hydrogels as potential materials for artificial cartilage. Concerning each DN gel material, a total of 12 specimens were prepared, and 6 of the 12 specimens were examined to determine the mechanical properties without any treatments. The remaining 6 specimens were implanted into the subcutaneous tissue, using 6 mature female rabbits. At 6 weeks after implantation, the mechanical properties and the water content of the implanted specimens were measured. In the poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl-propane sulfonic acid)/poly(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel, the ultimate stress and the tangent modulus were significantly increased from 3.10 and 0.20 MPa, respectively, to 5.40 and 0.37 MPa, respectively, with a significant reduction of the water content after implantation (94 to 91%). In the poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl-propane sulfonic acid)/polyacrylamide DN gel and the cellulose/poly(dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel, the stress (11.4 and 1.90 MPa, respectively) and the modulus (0.30 and 1.70 MPa, respectively) or the water content rarely changed after implantation (90 and 85%, respectively). In the bacterial cellulose/gelatin DN gel, the ultimate stress was dramatically reduced from 4.30 to 1.98 MPa with a significant increase of the water content after implantation (78 to 86%). This study implied that these DN gels except for the cellulose/gelatin DN gel are potential materials that may meet the requirements of artificial cartilage. SN - 1549-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17117467/Biodegradation_of_high_toughness_double_network_hydrogels_as_potential_materials_for_artificial_cartilage_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.31043 ER -