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Childhood anemia and vitamin a deficiency in rural Bangladesh.

Abstract

The study aimed to assess the prevalence of anemia and vitamin A deficiency in preschool children in rural Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was done on eight randomly-selected sub-districts of rural Bangladesh. Children (n=1,302) aged 2-6 years were studied. Families of 43% of the study participants had a monthly household expenditure of US$ 60 or less. Fifty-six percent of the children were underweight, and 17% were severely underweight; 18% were wasted, and 1% were severely wasted; and 45% were stunted while 20% were severely stunted. The mean+/-SD serum retinol of the children was1.0+/-0.4 micromol/l, and 3% of them had serum retinol levels of <0.35 micromol/l, about one-fifth (20%) had a serum retinol level of <0.70 micromol/l and 55% had serum retinol levels of <1.05 pmol/l. The mean hemoglobin concentration of the children was 110+/-11 g/l, and 48% had a Hb of <11 g/l signifying anemia in this age group. Thirty-one percent (31 %) of children had low serum ferritin (<12 microg/l), and 14% had elevated CRP (> or = 15 mg/l) indicating the presence of a sub-clinical infection. Male and female children had similar nutritional status and biochemical profiles although boys tended to be heavier than girls (p=0.013). The proportion of children with anemia and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) declined significantly (p<0.001) with advancing age. Five percent of the study children had IDA and concomitant low serum retinol. The proportion of children with IDA and serum retinol also declined significantly with increasing age from 8% in children aged 35 months or younger, to 3% in children aged 60 months and more (p=0.025). Results of our study clearly demonstrated the public health importance of anemia and vitamin A deficiency among children of rural Bangladesh.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ICDDR,B: Center for Health and Population Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh. gfaruque@icddrb.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17121305

Citation

Faruque, Abu S G., et al. "Childhood Anemia and Vitamin a Deficiency in Rural Bangladesh." The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol. 37, no. 4, 2006, pp. 771-7.
Faruque AS, Khan AI, Malek MA, et al. Childhood anemia and vitamin a deficiency in rural Bangladesh. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2006;37(4):771-7.
Faruque, A. S., Khan, A. I., Malek, M. A., Huq, S., Wahed, M. A., Salam, M. A., Fuchs, G. J., & Khaled, M. A. (2006). Childhood anemia and vitamin a deficiency in rural Bangladesh. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 37(4), 771-7.
Faruque AS, et al. Childhood Anemia and Vitamin a Deficiency in Rural Bangladesh. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2006;37(4):771-7. PubMed PMID: 17121305.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood anemia and vitamin a deficiency in rural Bangladesh. AU - Faruque,Abu S G, AU - Khan,Ashraful I, AU - Malek,Mohammed A, AU - Huq,Sayeeda, AU - Wahed,Mohammed A, AU - Salam,Mohammed A, AU - Fuchs,George J, AU - Khaled,Mohammed A, PY - 2006/11/24/pubmed PY - 2007/2/28/medline PY - 2006/11/24/entrez SP - 771 EP - 7 JF - The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health JO - Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health VL - 37 IS - 4 N2 - The study aimed to assess the prevalence of anemia and vitamin A deficiency in preschool children in rural Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was done on eight randomly-selected sub-districts of rural Bangladesh. Children (n=1,302) aged 2-6 years were studied. Families of 43% of the study participants had a monthly household expenditure of US$ 60 or less. Fifty-six percent of the children were underweight, and 17% were severely underweight; 18% were wasted, and 1% were severely wasted; and 45% were stunted while 20% were severely stunted. The mean+/-SD serum retinol of the children was1.0+/-0.4 micromol/l, and 3% of them had serum retinol levels of <0.35 micromol/l, about one-fifth (20%) had a serum retinol level of <0.70 micromol/l and 55% had serum retinol levels of <1.05 pmol/l. The mean hemoglobin concentration of the children was 110+/-11 g/l, and 48% had a Hb of <11 g/l signifying anemia in this age group. Thirty-one percent (31 %) of children had low serum ferritin (<12 microg/l), and 14% had elevated CRP (> or = 15 mg/l) indicating the presence of a sub-clinical infection. Male and female children had similar nutritional status and biochemical profiles although boys tended to be heavier than girls (p=0.013). The proportion of children with anemia and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) declined significantly (p<0.001) with advancing age. Five percent of the study children had IDA and concomitant low serum retinol. The proportion of children with IDA and serum retinol also declined significantly with increasing age from 8% in children aged 35 months or younger, to 3% in children aged 60 months and more (p=0.025). Results of our study clearly demonstrated the public health importance of anemia and vitamin A deficiency among children of rural Bangladesh. SN - 0125-1562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17121305/Childhood_anemia_and_vitamin_a_deficiency_in_rural_Bangladesh_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/441 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -