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Alcohol intake and incidence of coronary disease in Australian aborigines.

Abstract

AIMS

To examine risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in relation to alcohol in a cohort of Australian Aborigines.

METHODS

In 1988-1989, alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and beverage preference were elicited by interviewer-administered questionnaire in Western Australian Aborigines (258 men and 256 women) and cardiovascular outcomes ascertained through linkage to mortality and hospital admission records to 2002.

RESULTS

In proportional hazards models, risk for CHD, relative to lifetime abstainers, was significantly increased in ex-drinkers [Hazard ratio (HR), 2.29; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.23-4.27], those drinking 41-60 g/day in men or 21-40 g/day in women (HR 2.80; 95% CI, 1.04-7.53) and those drinking >150 g/day for men or >100 g/day for women (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.03-4.90) with a J-shaped relationship. Low-to-moderate drinkers had lower waist girth, exercised more and had a lower prevalence of overweight and smoking than at-risk drinkers. A preference for wine was associated with lower HR (0.28; 95% CI, 0.10-0.95). With CVD, only ex-drinkers showed significantly increased risk (HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.20-2.91).

CONCLUSIONS

More favourable health-related behaviours in low-to-moderate drinkers suggest that lower risk could be mediated by lifestyle, as proposed in other populations.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Western Australia, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, Box X2213 GPO, Perth 6847, Australia. vburke@cyllene.uwa.edu.au

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cause of Death
    Cohort Studies
    Coronary Disease
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Female
    Health Behavior
    Humans
    Incidence
    Life Style
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Oceanic Ancestry Group
    Patient Admission
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Statistics as Topic
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Waist-Hip Ratio
    Western Australia
    Wine

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17121750

    Citation

    Burke, V, et al. "Alcohol Intake and Incidence of Coronary Disease in Australian Aborigines." Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), vol. 42, no. 1, 2007, pp. 49-54.
    Burke V, Lee AH, Hunter E, et al. Alcohol intake and incidence of coronary disease in Australian aborigines. Alcohol Alcohol. 2007;42(1):49-54.
    Burke, V., Lee, A. H., Hunter, E., Spargo, R., Smith, R., Beilin, L. J., & Puddey, I. B. (2007). Alcohol intake and incidence of coronary disease in Australian aborigines. Alcohol and Alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), 42(1), pp. 49-54.
    Burke V, et al. Alcohol Intake and Incidence of Coronary Disease in Australian Aborigines. Alcohol Alcohol. 2007;42(1):49-54. PubMed PMID: 17121750.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol intake and incidence of coronary disease in Australian aborigines. AU - Burke,V, AU - Lee,A H, AU - Hunter,E, AU - Spargo,R, AU - Smith,R, AU - Beilin,L J, AU - Puddey,I B, Y1 - 2006/11/22/ PY - 2006/11/24/pubmed PY - 2007/6/27/medline PY - 2006/11/24/entrez SP - 49 EP - 54 JF - Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire) JO - Alcohol Alcohol. VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: To examine risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in relation to alcohol in a cohort of Australian Aborigines. METHODS: In 1988-1989, alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and beverage preference were elicited by interviewer-administered questionnaire in Western Australian Aborigines (258 men and 256 women) and cardiovascular outcomes ascertained through linkage to mortality and hospital admission records to 2002. RESULTS: In proportional hazards models, risk for CHD, relative to lifetime abstainers, was significantly increased in ex-drinkers [Hazard ratio (HR), 2.29; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.23-4.27], those drinking 41-60 g/day in men or 21-40 g/day in women (HR 2.80; 95% CI, 1.04-7.53) and those drinking >150 g/day for men or >100 g/day for women (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.03-4.90) with a J-shaped relationship. Low-to-moderate drinkers had lower waist girth, exercised more and had a lower prevalence of overweight and smoking than at-risk drinkers. A preference for wine was associated with lower HR (0.28; 95% CI, 0.10-0.95). With CVD, only ex-drinkers showed significantly increased risk (HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.20-2.91). CONCLUSIONS: More favourable health-related behaviours in low-to-moderate drinkers suggest that lower risk could be mediated by lifestyle, as proposed in other populations. SN - 0735-0414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17121750/Alcohol_intake_and_incidence_of_coronary_disease_in_Australian_aborigines_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/alcalc/agl093 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -