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Temperament-creativity relationships in mood disorder patients, healthy controls and highly creative individuals.
J Affect Disord 2007; 100(1-3):41-8JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate temperament-creativity relationships in euthymic bipolar (BP) and unipolar major depressive (MDD) patients, creative discipline controls (CC), and healthy controls (HC).

METHODS

49 BP, 25 MDD, 32 CC, and 47 HC (all euthymic) completed three self-report temperament/personality measures: the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), the Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A), and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); and four creativity measures yielding six parameters: the Barron-Welsh Art Scale (BWAS-Total, BWAS-Like, and BWAS-Dislike), the Adjective Check List Creative Personality Scale (ACL-CPS), and the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking--Figural (TTCT-F) and Verbal (TTCT-V) versions. Factor analysis was used to consolidate the 16 subscales from the three temperament/personality measures, and the resulting factors were assessed in relationship to the creativity parameters.

RESULTS

Five personality/temperament factors emerged. Two of these factors had prominent relationships with creativity measures. A Neuroticism/Cyclothymia/Dysthymia Factor, comprised mostly of NEO-PI-R-Neuroticism and TEMPS-A-Cyclothymia and TEMPS-A-Dysthymia, was related to BWAS-Total scores (r=0.36, p<0.0001) and BWAS-Dislike subscale scores (r=0.39, p<0.0001). An Openness Factor, comprised mostly of NEO-PI-R-Openness, was related to BWAS-Like subscale scores (r=0.28, p=0.0006), and to ACL-CPS scores (r=0.46, p<0.0001). No significant relationship was found between temperament/personality and TTCT-F and TTCT-V scores.

CONCLUSIONS

Neuroticism/Cyclothymia/Dysthymia and Openness appear to have differential relationships with creativity. The former could provide affective (Neuroticism, i.e. access to negative affect, and Cyclothymia, i.e. changeability of affect) and the latter cognitive (flexibility) advantages to enhance creativity. Further studies are indicated to clarify mechanisms of creativity and its relationships to affective processes and bipolar disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Room 2124, Stanford, CA 94305-5723, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17126408

Citation

Strong, Connie M., et al. "Temperament-creativity Relationships in Mood Disorder Patients, Healthy Controls and Highly Creative Individuals." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 100, no. 1-3, 2007, pp. 41-8.
Strong CM, Nowakowska C, Santosa CM, et al. Temperament-creativity relationships in mood disorder patients, healthy controls and highly creative individuals. J Affect Disord. 2007;100(1-3):41-8.
Strong, C. M., Nowakowska, C., Santosa, C. M., Wang, P. W., Kraemer, H. C., & Ketter, T. A. (2007). Temperament-creativity relationships in mood disorder patients, healthy controls and highly creative individuals. Journal of Affective Disorders, 100(1-3), pp. 41-8.
Strong CM, et al. Temperament-creativity Relationships in Mood Disorder Patients, Healthy Controls and Highly Creative Individuals. J Affect Disord. 2007;100(1-3):41-8. PubMed PMID: 17126408.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Temperament-creativity relationships in mood disorder patients, healthy controls and highly creative individuals. AU - Strong,Connie M, AU - Nowakowska,Cecylia, AU - Santosa,Claudia M, AU - Wang,Po W, AU - Kraemer,Helena C, AU - Ketter,Terence A, Y1 - 2006/11/28/ PY - 2006/07/12/received PY - 2006/10/02/revised PY - 2006/10/13/accepted PY - 2006/11/28/pubmed PY - 2007/8/24/medline PY - 2006/11/28/entrez SP - 41 EP - 8 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 100 IS - 1-3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate temperament-creativity relationships in euthymic bipolar (BP) and unipolar major depressive (MDD) patients, creative discipline controls (CC), and healthy controls (HC). METHODS: 49 BP, 25 MDD, 32 CC, and 47 HC (all euthymic) completed three self-report temperament/personality measures: the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), the Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A), and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); and four creativity measures yielding six parameters: the Barron-Welsh Art Scale (BWAS-Total, BWAS-Like, and BWAS-Dislike), the Adjective Check List Creative Personality Scale (ACL-CPS), and the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking--Figural (TTCT-F) and Verbal (TTCT-V) versions. Factor analysis was used to consolidate the 16 subscales from the three temperament/personality measures, and the resulting factors were assessed in relationship to the creativity parameters. RESULTS: Five personality/temperament factors emerged. Two of these factors had prominent relationships with creativity measures. A Neuroticism/Cyclothymia/Dysthymia Factor, comprised mostly of NEO-PI-R-Neuroticism and TEMPS-A-Cyclothymia and TEMPS-A-Dysthymia, was related to BWAS-Total scores (r=0.36, p<0.0001) and BWAS-Dislike subscale scores (r=0.39, p<0.0001). An Openness Factor, comprised mostly of NEO-PI-R-Openness, was related to BWAS-Like subscale scores (r=0.28, p=0.0006), and to ACL-CPS scores (r=0.46, p<0.0001). No significant relationship was found between temperament/personality and TTCT-F and TTCT-V scores. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroticism/Cyclothymia/Dysthymia and Openness appear to have differential relationships with creativity. The former could provide affective (Neuroticism, i.e. access to negative affect, and Cyclothymia, i.e. changeability of affect) and the latter cognitive (flexibility) advantages to enhance creativity. Further studies are indicated to clarify mechanisms of creativity and its relationships to affective processes and bipolar disorders. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17126408/Temperament_creativity_relationships_in_mood_disorder_patients_healthy_controls_and_highly_creative_individuals_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(06)00454-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -