Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Beverage consumption in the US population.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Dec; 106(12):1992-2000.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to examine beverage consumption across age, sex, and race/ethnicity categories using the most current data available, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002.

DESIGN

Beverage consumption that included fluid milk, fruit juices, regular and diet carbonated soft drinks, regular and diet fruit drinks/ades, coffee, and tea was examined among white, African-American, and Mexican-American persons in age groups 6 to 11 years, 12 to 19 years, 20 to 39 years, 40 to 59 years, and >60 years. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 were used in this study.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Group means were estimated for the age group, sex, and race/ethnicity subgroups. The probability that any of these group means were equal to one another was tested using statistical software.

RESULTS

The data showed marked differences in beverage consumption depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. In general, males consumed more beverages than did females. Specifically, white and Mexican-American persons of all ages consumed more milk than did African-American persons. On average, African-American males and females of all ages consumed significantly more fruit drinks/ades than did other race/ethnicity groups. In contrast, white persons consumed more carbonated soft drinks than did other race/ethnicity groups.

CONCLUSION

Average beverage consumption varied depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Knowledge of differences in beverage consumption patterns is important for food and nutrition professionals and nutrition policymakers. Better understanding of the many factors that influence beverage consumption levels is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Food, Nutrition, and Agriculture Policy, University of Maryland, College Park, 1122 Patapsco, College Park, MD 20742, USA. storey@umd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17126630

Citation

Storey, Maureen L., et al. "Beverage Consumption in the US Population." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 106, no. 12, 2006, pp. 1992-2000.
Storey ML, Forshee RA, Anderson PA. Beverage consumption in the US population. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(12):1992-2000.
Storey, M. L., Forshee, R. A., & Anderson, P. A. (2006). Beverage consumption in the US population. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(12), 1992-2000.
Storey ML, Forshee RA, Anderson PA. Beverage Consumption in the US Population. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(12):1992-2000. PubMed PMID: 17126630.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beverage consumption in the US population. AU - Storey,Maureen L, AU - Forshee,Richard A, AU - Anderson,Patricia A, PY - 2005/08/17/received PY - 2006/11/28/pubmed PY - 2007/1/11/medline PY - 2006/11/28/entrez SP - 1992 EP - 2000 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 106 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine beverage consumption across age, sex, and race/ethnicity categories using the most current data available, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. DESIGN: Beverage consumption that included fluid milk, fruit juices, regular and diet carbonated soft drinks, regular and diet fruit drinks/ades, coffee, and tea was examined among white, African-American, and Mexican-American persons in age groups 6 to 11 years, 12 to 19 years, 20 to 39 years, 40 to 59 years, and >60 years. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 were used in this study. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Group means were estimated for the age group, sex, and race/ethnicity subgroups. The probability that any of these group means were equal to one another was tested using statistical software. RESULTS: The data showed marked differences in beverage consumption depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. In general, males consumed more beverages than did females. Specifically, white and Mexican-American persons of all ages consumed more milk than did African-American persons. On average, African-American males and females of all ages consumed significantly more fruit drinks/ades than did other race/ethnicity groups. In contrast, white persons consumed more carbonated soft drinks than did other race/ethnicity groups. CONCLUSION: Average beverage consumption varied depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Knowledge of differences in beverage consumption patterns is important for food and nutrition professionals and nutrition policymakers. Better understanding of the many factors that influence beverage consumption levels is needed. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17126630/Beverage_consumption_in_the_US_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)02091-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -