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Gallstone disease: Primary and secondary prevention.
Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol 2006; 20(6):1063-73BP

Abstract

Several risk factors for cholesterol gallstone formation in the general population have been identified. There is a strongly increased risk of gallstone disease during prolonged fasting, rapid weight loss, total parenteral nutrition, and somatostatin(-analogue) treatment. The annual risk of biliary colic and gallstone complications in asymptomatic gallstone carriers has been investigated sparsely. In asymptomatic and symptomatic gallstone carriers, treatment with the hydrophilic bile salt ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been claimed to reduce the risk of biliary colic and gallstone complications such as acute cholecystitis and acute pancreatitis. Also, prophylactic cholecystectomy could be beneficial in certain subgroups of asymptomatic gallstone carriers. However, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials are lacking. In this review, strategies for the prevention of gallstone formation in the general population and in high-risk conditions are dealt with. Also, strategies for the prevention of biliary colic and gallstone complications in asymptomatic and symptomatic gallstone carriers are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastrointestinal Research Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. nielsvenneman@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17127188

Citation

Venneman, Niels G., and Karel J. van Erpecum. "Gallstone Disease: Primary and Secondary Prevention." Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 20, no. 6, 2006, pp. 1063-73.
Venneman NG, van Erpecum KJ. Gallstone disease: Primary and secondary prevention. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2006;20(6):1063-73.
Venneman, N. G., & van Erpecum, K. J. (2006). Gallstone disease: Primary and secondary prevention. Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology, 20(6), pp. 1063-73.
Venneman NG, van Erpecum KJ. Gallstone Disease: Primary and Secondary Prevention. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2006;20(6):1063-73. PubMed PMID: 17127188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gallstone disease: Primary and secondary prevention. AU - Venneman,Niels G, AU - van Erpecum,Karel J, PY - 2006/11/28/pubmed PY - 2007/2/21/medline PY - 2006/11/28/entrez SP - 1063 EP - 73 JF - Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology JO - Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol VL - 20 IS - 6 N2 - Several risk factors for cholesterol gallstone formation in the general population have been identified. There is a strongly increased risk of gallstone disease during prolonged fasting, rapid weight loss, total parenteral nutrition, and somatostatin(-analogue) treatment. The annual risk of biliary colic and gallstone complications in asymptomatic gallstone carriers has been investigated sparsely. In asymptomatic and symptomatic gallstone carriers, treatment with the hydrophilic bile salt ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been claimed to reduce the risk of biliary colic and gallstone complications such as acute cholecystitis and acute pancreatitis. Also, prophylactic cholecystectomy could be beneficial in certain subgroups of asymptomatic gallstone carriers. However, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials are lacking. In this review, strategies for the prevention of gallstone formation in the general population and in high-risk conditions are dealt with. Also, strategies for the prevention of biliary colic and gallstone complications in asymptomatic and symptomatic gallstone carriers are discussed. SN - 1521-6918 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17127188/Gallstone_disease:_Primary_and_secondary_prevention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1521-6918(06)00036-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -