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The association between obesity and the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in symptomatic ageing men.
Med J Aust. 2006 Oct 16; 185(8):424-7.MJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the influence of obesity on the diagnosis of age-related androgen deficiency (AD) in symptomatic men according to current Australian guidelines.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

A community-based cohort of healthy ageing men with symptoms suggestive of AD was studied between May 2001 and February 2003. Men were classified as obese or non-obese according to body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Diagnosis of AD according to Endocrine Society of Australia (ESA) guidelines.

RESULTS

223 men aged 54-86 years with mean BMI 27.3 +/- 0.2 kg/m2 (range 20.5-36.2 kg/m2) were recruited; 99 men were obese (BMI > or = 30.0 kg/m2 or WC > or = 102 cm) and 124 men were non-obese. Obese men had lower total testosterone (TT) (12.7 +/- 0.4 v 15.0 +/- 0.4 nmol/L); P < 0.001) and calculated free testosterone (275.7 +/- 7.8 v 299.3 +/- 7.4 pmol/L); P = 0.03) levels than non-obese men. TT levels < 8 nmol/L were recorded in 12% of obese men and 1% of non-obese men. Applying the ESA guidelines for the diagnosis of age-related AD, 15 obese men (15%) and 4 non-obese men (3%) were classified as being eligible for androgen therapy supported by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS); the relative risk in obese men was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.44-2.55; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

Obesity is an important determinant of serum TT levels in ageing men. Almost one in seven obese men but only one in 30 non-obese men in our study were eligible for PBS-supported androgen therapy according to Australian guidelines. Although obese men are more likely to have biochemical hypoandrogenism, the clinical implications of this remain uncertain. Studies of testosterone therapy in this group of ageing men are needed to determine whether androgen replacement is beneficial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Prince Henry's Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17137431

Citation

Allan, Carolyn A., et al. "The Association Between Obesity and the Diagnosis of Androgen Deficiency in Symptomatic Ageing Men." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 185, no. 8, 2006, pp. 424-7.
Allan CA, Strauss BJ, Burger HG, et al. The association between obesity and the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in symptomatic ageing men. Med J Aust. 2006;185(8):424-7.
Allan, C. A., Strauss, B. J., Burger, H. G., Forbes, E. A., & McLachlan, R. I. (2006). The association between obesity and the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in symptomatic ageing men. The Medical Journal of Australia, 185(8), 424-7.
Allan CA, et al. The Association Between Obesity and the Diagnosis of Androgen Deficiency in Symptomatic Ageing Men. Med J Aust. 2006 Oct 16;185(8):424-7. PubMed PMID: 17137431.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association between obesity and the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in symptomatic ageing men. AU - Allan,Carolyn A, AU - Strauss,Boyd J, AU - Burger,Henry G, AU - Forbes,Elise A, AU - McLachlan,Robert I, PY - 2006/06/20/received PY - 2006/08/30/accepted PY - 2006/12/2/pubmed PY - 2007/1/11/medline PY - 2006/12/2/entrez SP - 424 EP - 7 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 185 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of obesity on the diagnosis of age-related androgen deficiency (AD) in symptomatic men according to current Australian guidelines. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A community-based cohort of healthy ageing men with symptoms suggestive of AD was studied between May 2001 and February 2003. Men were classified as obese or non-obese according to body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Diagnosis of AD according to Endocrine Society of Australia (ESA) guidelines. RESULTS: 223 men aged 54-86 years with mean BMI 27.3 +/- 0.2 kg/m2 (range 20.5-36.2 kg/m2) were recruited; 99 men were obese (BMI > or = 30.0 kg/m2 or WC > or = 102 cm) and 124 men were non-obese. Obese men had lower total testosterone (TT) (12.7 +/- 0.4 v 15.0 +/- 0.4 nmol/L); P < 0.001) and calculated free testosterone (275.7 +/- 7.8 v 299.3 +/- 7.4 pmol/L); P = 0.03) levels than non-obese men. TT levels < 8 nmol/L were recorded in 12% of obese men and 1% of non-obese men. Applying the ESA guidelines for the diagnosis of age-related AD, 15 obese men (15%) and 4 non-obese men (3%) were classified as being eligible for androgen therapy supported by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS); the relative risk in obese men was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.44-2.55; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Obesity is an important determinant of serum TT levels in ageing men. Almost one in seven obese men but only one in 30 non-obese men in our study were eligible for PBS-supported androgen therapy according to Australian guidelines. Although obese men are more likely to have biochemical hypoandrogenism, the clinical implications of this remain uncertain. Studies of testosterone therapy in this group of ageing men are needed to determine whether androgen replacement is beneficial. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17137431/The_association_between_obesity_and_the_diagnosis_of_androgen_deficiency_in_symptomatic_ageing_men_ L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/185_08_161006/all10670_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -