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Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006 Nov 30; 7:92.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new type of exercise that has been increasingly tested for the ability to prevent bone fractures and osteoporosis in frail people. There are two currently marketed vibrating plates: a) the whole plate oscillates up and down; b) reciprocating vertical displacements on the left and right side of a fulcrum, increasing the lateral accelerations. A few studies have shown recently the effectiveness of the up-and-down plate for increasing Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and balance; but the effectiveness of the reciprocating plate technique remains mainly unknown. The aim was to compare the effects of WBV using a reciprocating platform at frequencies lower than 20 Hz and a walking-based exercise programme on BMD and balance in post-menopausal women.

METHODS

Twenty-eight physically untrained post-menopausal women were assigned at random to a WBV group or a Walking group. Both experimental programmes consisted of 3 sessions per week for 8 months. Each vibratory session included 6 bouts of 1 min (12.6 Hz in frequency and 3 cm in amplitude with 60 degrees of knee flexion) with 1 min rest between bouts. Each walking session was 55 minutes of walking and 5 minutes of stretching. Hip and lumbar BMD (g.cm-2) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and balance was assessed by the blind flamingo test. ANOVA for repeated measurements was adjusted by baseline data, weight and age.

RESULTS

After 8 months, BMD at the femoral neck in the WBV group was increased by 4.3% (P = 0.011) compared to the Walking group. In contrast, the BMD at the lumbar spine was unaltered in both groups. Balance was improved in the WBV group (29%) but not in the Walking group.

CONCLUSION

The 8-month course of vibratory exercise using a reciprocating plate is feasible and is more effective than walking to improve two major determinants of bone fractures: hip BMD and balance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain. ngusi@unex.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17137514

Citation

Gusi, Narcís, et al. "Low-frequency Vibratory Exercise Reduces the Risk of Bone Fracture More Than Walking: a Randomized Controlled Trial." BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 7, 2006, p. 92.
Gusi N, Raimundo A, Leal A. Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006;7:92.
Gusi, N., Raimundo, A., & Leal, A. (2006). Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 7, 92.
Gusi N, Raimundo A, Leal A. Low-frequency Vibratory Exercise Reduces the Risk of Bone Fracture More Than Walking: a Randomized Controlled Trial. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2006 Nov 30;7:92. PubMed PMID: 17137514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-frequency vibratory exercise reduces the risk of bone fracture more than walking: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Gusi,Narcís, AU - Raimundo,Armando, AU - Leal,Alejo, Y1 - 2006/11/30/ PY - 2006/08/07/received PY - 2006/11/30/accepted PY - 2006/12/2/pubmed PY - 2007/1/6/medline PY - 2006/12/2/entrez SP - 92 EP - 92 JF - BMC musculoskeletal disorders JO - BMC Musculoskelet Disord VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a new type of exercise that has been increasingly tested for the ability to prevent bone fractures and osteoporosis in frail people. There are two currently marketed vibrating plates: a) the whole plate oscillates up and down; b) reciprocating vertical displacements on the left and right side of a fulcrum, increasing the lateral accelerations. A few studies have shown recently the effectiveness of the up-and-down plate for increasing Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and balance; but the effectiveness of the reciprocating plate technique remains mainly unknown. The aim was to compare the effects of WBV using a reciprocating platform at frequencies lower than 20 Hz and a walking-based exercise programme on BMD and balance in post-menopausal women. METHODS: Twenty-eight physically untrained post-menopausal women were assigned at random to a WBV group or a Walking group. Both experimental programmes consisted of 3 sessions per week for 8 months. Each vibratory session included 6 bouts of 1 min (12.6 Hz in frequency and 3 cm in amplitude with 60 degrees of knee flexion) with 1 min rest between bouts. Each walking session was 55 minutes of walking and 5 minutes of stretching. Hip and lumbar BMD (g.cm-2) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and balance was assessed by the blind flamingo test. ANOVA for repeated measurements was adjusted by baseline data, weight and age. RESULTS: After 8 months, BMD at the femoral neck in the WBV group was increased by 4.3% (P = 0.011) compared to the Walking group. In contrast, the BMD at the lumbar spine was unaltered in both groups. Balance was improved in the WBV group (29%) but not in the Walking group. CONCLUSION: The 8-month course of vibratory exercise using a reciprocating plate is feasible and is more effective than walking to improve two major determinants of bone fractures: hip BMD and balance. SN - 1471-2474 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17137514/Low_frequency_vibratory_exercise_reduces_the_risk_of_bone_fracture_more_than_walking:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2474-7-92 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -