Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal soothing and infant stress responses: soothing, crying and adrenocortical activity during inoculation.
Infant Behav Dev. 2006 Jan; 29(1):70-9.IB

Abstract

The relation between maternal soothing and infant stress response during inoculation was examined in a sample of 37 mothers and their 3-month-old infants. The mothers' soothing and the infants' cry vocalizations and the mothers' and the infants' salivary cortisol level pre- and post-injection were analysed. There was a positive relation between infants' cry vocalization post-injection and maternal soothing pre- and post-injection. The sample was divided in two sub-groups depending on whether the mothers evidenced most soothing of the infants in the period before (Preparatory group; n=20) or after (Contingent group; n=17) the syringe injection. In the Preparatory group, the duration of infant cry vocalizations was related to amount of maternal soothing before and after the injection, while cry vocalizations in the Contingent group was related to amount of maternal soothing after the injection. The Contingent infants responded to the injection with a significant increase in cortisol, while there was no increase in the Preparatory infants. The Preparatory infants evidenced significantly longer duration of looking at the target stimuli in a visual marking task, suggesting greater difficulties in disengaging attention. These findings indicate that 3-month-olds' stress responses and their mothers' situational behaviour are mutually regulated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7800, 5020 Bergen, Norway. hanne.braarud@rbup.uib.noNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17138263

Citation

Braarud, Hanne Cecilie, and Kjell Morten Stormark. "Maternal Soothing and Infant Stress Responses: Soothing, Crying and Adrenocortical Activity During Inoculation." Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 29, no. 1, 2006, pp. 70-9.
Braarud HC, Stormark KM. Maternal soothing and infant stress responses: soothing, crying and adrenocortical activity during inoculation. Infant Behav Dev. 2006;29(1):70-9.
Braarud, H. C., & Stormark, K. M. (2006). Maternal soothing and infant stress responses: soothing, crying and adrenocortical activity during inoculation. Infant Behavior & Development, 29(1), 70-9.
Braarud HC, Stormark KM. Maternal Soothing and Infant Stress Responses: Soothing, Crying and Adrenocortical Activity During Inoculation. Infant Behav Dev. 2006;29(1):70-9. PubMed PMID: 17138263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal soothing and infant stress responses: soothing, crying and adrenocortical activity during inoculation. AU - Braarud,Hanne Cecilie, AU - Stormark,Kjell Morten, Y1 - 2005/10/26/ PY - 2004/08/26/received PY - 2005/07/27/revised PY - 2005/08/01/accepted PY - 2006/12/2/pubmed PY - 2007/2/3/medline PY - 2006/12/2/entrez SP - 70 EP - 9 JF - Infant behavior & development JO - Infant Behav Dev VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - The relation between maternal soothing and infant stress response during inoculation was examined in a sample of 37 mothers and their 3-month-old infants. The mothers' soothing and the infants' cry vocalizations and the mothers' and the infants' salivary cortisol level pre- and post-injection were analysed. There was a positive relation between infants' cry vocalization post-injection and maternal soothing pre- and post-injection. The sample was divided in two sub-groups depending on whether the mothers evidenced most soothing of the infants in the period before (Preparatory group; n=20) or after (Contingent group; n=17) the syringe injection. In the Preparatory group, the duration of infant cry vocalizations was related to amount of maternal soothing before and after the injection, while cry vocalizations in the Contingent group was related to amount of maternal soothing after the injection. The Contingent infants responded to the injection with a significant increase in cortisol, while there was no increase in the Preparatory infants. The Preparatory infants evidenced significantly longer duration of looking at the target stimuli in a visual marking task, suggesting greater difficulties in disengaging attention. These findings indicate that 3-month-olds' stress responses and their mothers' situational behaviour are mutually regulated. SN - 1934-8800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17138263/Maternal_soothing_and_infant_stress_responses:_soothing_crying_and_adrenocortical_activity_during_inoculation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-6383(05)00077-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -