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Use of mental health services and subjective satisfaction with treatment among Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life.
Am J Public Health. 2007 Jan; 97(1):60-7.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined the use rates and correlates of formal psychiatric services among the US-born and immigrant Caribbean Black population.

METHODS

We compared overall mental health service use in samples of Caribbean Blacks and African Americans and examined the within-sample ethnic variation among Caribbean Blacks, including for ethnic origin (Spanish Caribbean, Haiti, and English Caribbean), nativity status (those born in or outside the United States), number of years spent living in the United States, age at the time of immigration, and generational status.

RESULTS

African Americans and Caribbean Blacks used formal mental health care services at relatively low rates. Among Caribbean Blacks, generational status and nativity showed the greatest effects on rates of reported use, satisfaction, and perceived helpfulness. Of those study participants who met the criteria for disorders as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, about one third used formal mental health care services. The US-born subjects were more likely to receive care than were first-generation immigrants.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study underscores the importance of ethnicity, immigration, and migration-related factors, within racial categorization, as it pertains to the use of mental health services in the United States. Our findings suggest that timing of migration and generational status of Caribbean Black immigrants and ancestry groups contribute to important differences in rates and sources of use, relative satisfaction, and perception of helpfulness, with regard to formal mental health services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, and the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48106-1248, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17138907

Citation

Jackson, James S., et al. "Use of Mental Health Services and Subjective Satisfaction With Treatment Among Black Caribbean Immigrants: Results From the National Survey of American Life." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 97, no. 1, 2007, pp. 60-7.
Jackson JS, Neighbors HW, Torres M, et al. Use of mental health services and subjective satisfaction with treatment among Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. Am J Public Health. 2007;97(1):60-7.
Jackson, J. S., Neighbors, H. W., Torres, M., Martin, L. A., Williams, D. R., & Baser, R. (2007). Use of mental health services and subjective satisfaction with treatment among Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1), 60-7.
Jackson JS, et al. Use of Mental Health Services and Subjective Satisfaction With Treatment Among Black Caribbean Immigrants: Results From the National Survey of American Life. Am J Public Health. 2007;97(1):60-7. PubMed PMID: 17138907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of mental health services and subjective satisfaction with treatment among Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. AU - Jackson,James S, AU - Neighbors,Harold W, AU - Torres,Myriam, AU - Martin,Lisa A, AU - Williams,David R, AU - Baser,Raymond, Y1 - 2006/11/30/ PY - 2006/12/2/pubmed PY - 2007/1/9/medline PY - 2006/12/2/entrez SP - 60 EP - 7 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 97 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined the use rates and correlates of formal psychiatric services among the US-born and immigrant Caribbean Black population. METHODS: We compared overall mental health service use in samples of Caribbean Blacks and African Americans and examined the within-sample ethnic variation among Caribbean Blacks, including for ethnic origin (Spanish Caribbean, Haiti, and English Caribbean), nativity status (those born in or outside the United States), number of years spent living in the United States, age at the time of immigration, and generational status. RESULTS: African Americans and Caribbean Blacks used formal mental health care services at relatively low rates. Among Caribbean Blacks, generational status and nativity showed the greatest effects on rates of reported use, satisfaction, and perceived helpfulness. Of those study participants who met the criteria for disorders as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, about one third used formal mental health care services. The US-born subjects were more likely to receive care than were first-generation immigrants. CONCLUSIONS: Our study underscores the importance of ethnicity, immigration, and migration-related factors, within racial categorization, as it pertains to the use of mental health services in the United States. Our findings suggest that timing of migration and generational status of Caribbean Black immigrants and ancestry groups contribute to important differences in rates and sources of use, relative satisfaction, and perception of helpfulness, with regard to formal mental health services. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17138907/Use_of_mental_health_services_and_subjective_satisfaction_with_treatment_among_Black_Caribbean_immigrants:_results_from_the_National_Survey_of_American_Life_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2006.088500?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -