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The mental health of Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life.
Am J Public Health. 2007 Jan; 97(1):52-9.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among Black Caribbean immigrant ("Caribbean Black") and African American populations and the correlates of psychiatric disorders among the Caribbean Black population.

METHODS

We conducted descriptive and age-adjusted analyses of the data from the National Survey of American Life--an in-person household mental health survey of noninstitutionalized US Blacks. We assessed psychiatric disorders as defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

RESULTS

Compared with African American men, Caribbean Black men had higher risks for 12-month rates of psychiatric disorders. Caribbean Black women had lower odds for 12-month and lifetime psychiatric disorders compared with African American women. Risks varied by ethnicity, immigration history, and generation status within the Caribbean sample. First-generation Caribbean Blacks had lower rates of psychiatric disorders compared with second- or third-generation Caribbean Blacks, and, compared with first-generation Caribbean Blacks, third-generation Caribbean Blacks had markedly elevated rates of psychiatric disorders.

CONCLUSIONS

Mental health risks were associated with ethnic diversity within the US Black population. Increased exposure to minority status in the United States was associated with higher risks for psychiatric disorders among Black Caribbean immigrants, which possibly reflects increased societal stress and downward social mobility associated with being Black in America.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology and the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. dwilliam@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17138909

Citation

Williams, David R., et al. "The Mental Health of Black Caribbean Immigrants: Results From the National Survey of American Life." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 97, no. 1, 2007, pp. 52-9.
Williams DR, Haile R, González HM, et al. The mental health of Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. Am J Public Health. 2007;97(1):52-9.
Williams, D. R., Haile, R., González, H. M., Neighbors, H., Baser, R., & Jackson, J. S. (2007). The mental health of Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. American Journal of Public Health, 97(1), 52-9.
Williams DR, et al. The Mental Health of Black Caribbean Immigrants: Results From the National Survey of American Life. Am J Public Health. 2007;97(1):52-9. PubMed PMID: 17138909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The mental health of Black Caribbean immigrants: results from the National Survey of American Life. AU - Williams,David R, AU - Haile,Rahwa, AU - González,Hector M, AU - Neighbors,Harold, AU - Baser,Raymond, AU - Jackson,James S, Y1 - 2006/11/30/ PY - 2006/12/2/pubmed PY - 2007/1/9/medline PY - 2006/12/2/entrez SP - 52 EP - 9 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 97 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among Black Caribbean immigrant ("Caribbean Black") and African American populations and the correlates of psychiatric disorders among the Caribbean Black population. METHODS: We conducted descriptive and age-adjusted analyses of the data from the National Survey of American Life--an in-person household mental health survey of noninstitutionalized US Blacks. We assessed psychiatric disorders as defined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. RESULTS: Compared with African American men, Caribbean Black men had higher risks for 12-month rates of psychiatric disorders. Caribbean Black women had lower odds for 12-month and lifetime psychiatric disorders compared with African American women. Risks varied by ethnicity, immigration history, and generation status within the Caribbean sample. First-generation Caribbean Blacks had lower rates of psychiatric disorders compared with second- or third-generation Caribbean Blacks, and, compared with first-generation Caribbean Blacks, third-generation Caribbean Blacks had markedly elevated rates of psychiatric disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health risks were associated with ethnic diversity within the US Black population. Increased exposure to minority status in the United States was associated with higher risks for psychiatric disorders among Black Caribbean immigrants, which possibly reflects increased societal stress and downward social mobility associated with being Black in America. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17138909/The_mental_health_of_Black_Caribbean_immigrants:_results_from_the_National_Survey_of_American_Life_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2006.088211?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -