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Antiviral effects on bacteriophages and rotavirus by cranberry juice.
Phytomedicine. 2007 Jan; 14(1):23-30.P

Abstract

Studies were undertaken to investigate the antiviral effects of comestible juices, especially cranberry juice, on non-related viral species. After exposure of bacteriophage T2 to a commercially available cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice cocktail (CJ), virus infectivity titer was no longer detectible. After a 60-min exposure to orange (OJ) and grapefruit juices (GJ), phage infectivity was reduced to 25-35% of control, respectively. Similar data were observed for the bacteriophage T4. CJ inactivation of phage T4 was rapid, dose-dependent, and occurred at either 4 or 23 degrees C. Neither pH nor differences in sugar/carbohydrate levels among the juices may be ascribed to the recognized antiviral effects. Further studies were performed to identify the occurrence of antiviral activity by CJ to a mammalian enteric virus. The treatment of the simian rotavirus SA-11 with a 20% CJ suspension was sufficient to inhibit hemagglutination. Under scanning and transmission electron microscopy, CJ was observed to inhibit the adsorption of phage T4 to its bacterial host cells and prevented the replication of rotavirus in its monkey kidney (MA-104) host cells, respectively. The data suggest, for the first time, a non-specific antiviral effect towards unrelated viral species (viz., bacteriophages T2 and T4 and the simian rotavirus SA-11) by a commercially available cranberry fruit juice drink.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Biology Department, St. Francis College, 180 Remsen Street, Brooklyn Heights, NY 11201, USA. slipson@stfranciscollege.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17140784

Citation

Lipson, S M., et al. "Antiviral Effects On Bacteriophages and Rotavirus By Cranberry Juice." Phytomedicine : International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology, vol. 14, no. 1, 2007, pp. 23-30.
Lipson SM, Sethi L, Cohen P, et al. Antiviral effects on bacteriophages and rotavirus by cranberry juice. Phytomedicine. 2007;14(1):23-30.
Lipson, S. M., Sethi, L., Cohen, P., Gordon, R. E., Tan, I. P., Burdowski, A., & Stotzky, G. (2007). Antiviral effects on bacteriophages and rotavirus by cranberry juice. Phytomedicine : International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology, 14(1), 23-30.
Lipson SM, et al. Antiviral Effects On Bacteriophages and Rotavirus By Cranberry Juice. Phytomedicine. 2007;14(1):23-30. PubMed PMID: 17140784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antiviral effects on bacteriophages and rotavirus by cranberry juice. AU - Lipson,S M, AU - Sethi,L, AU - Cohen,P, AU - Gordon,R E, AU - Tan,I P, AU - Burdowski,A, AU - Stotzky,G, Y1 - 2006/11/29/ PY - 2006/12/5/pubmed PY - 2007/4/3/medline PY - 2006/12/5/entrez SP - 23 EP - 30 JF - Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology JO - Phytomedicine VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - Studies were undertaken to investigate the antiviral effects of comestible juices, especially cranberry juice, on non-related viral species. After exposure of bacteriophage T2 to a commercially available cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice cocktail (CJ), virus infectivity titer was no longer detectible. After a 60-min exposure to orange (OJ) and grapefruit juices (GJ), phage infectivity was reduced to 25-35% of control, respectively. Similar data were observed for the bacteriophage T4. CJ inactivation of phage T4 was rapid, dose-dependent, and occurred at either 4 or 23 degrees C. Neither pH nor differences in sugar/carbohydrate levels among the juices may be ascribed to the recognized antiviral effects. Further studies were performed to identify the occurrence of antiviral activity by CJ to a mammalian enteric virus. The treatment of the simian rotavirus SA-11 with a 20% CJ suspension was sufficient to inhibit hemagglutination. Under scanning and transmission electron microscopy, CJ was observed to inhibit the adsorption of phage T4 to its bacterial host cells and prevented the replication of rotavirus in its monkey kidney (MA-104) host cells, respectively. The data suggest, for the first time, a non-specific antiviral effect towards unrelated viral species (viz., bacteriophages T2 and T4 and the simian rotavirus SA-11) by a commercially available cranberry fruit juice drink. SN - 0944-7113 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17140784/Antiviral_effects_on_bacteriophages_and_rotavirus_by_cranberry_juice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0944-7113(06)00186-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -