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An ecologic study of cancer mortality rates in Spain with respect to indices of solar UVB irradiance and smoking.
Int J Cancer 2007; 120(5):1123-8IJ

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that vitamin D reduces the risk of many types of cancer. Geographic variations in cancer mortality rates in Spain are apparently linked to variations in solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiances and other factors. Cancer mortality rates for 48 continental Spanish provinces for 1978-1992 were used in linear regression analyses with respect to mortality rates for latitude (an index of solar UVB levels), skin cancer (an index of high cumulative UVB irradiance), melanoma (an index related to solar UV irradiance and several other factors) and lung cancer (an index of cumulative effects of smoking). The 9 cancers with mortality rates significantly correlated with latitude for 1 or both sexes were brain, gastric, melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), pancreatic, pleural, rectal and thyroid cancer. Inverse correlations with latitude were found for laryngeal, lung and uterine corpus cancer. The 17 cancers inversely correlated with NMSC are bladder, brain, breast, colon, esophageal, gallbladder, Hodgkin's lymphoma, lung, melanoma, multiple myeloma, NHL, ovarian, pancreatic, pleural, rectal, thyroid and uterine corpus cancer. The 16 correlated with melanoma are bladder, brain, breast, colon, gallbladder, leukemia, lung, multiple myeloma, NHL, ovarian, pancreatic, pleural, prostate, rectal, renal and uterine corpus cancer. The results for lung cancer were in accordance with the literature. These results provide more support for the UVB/vitamin D/cancer hypothesis and indicate a new way to investigate the role of solar UV irradiance on cancer risk. They also provide more evidence that melanoma and NMSC have different etiologies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC) 2115 Van Ness Ave., MB 101 San Francisco, CA 94109-2510, USA. wbgrant@infionline.net

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17149699

Citation

Grant, William B.. "An Ecologic Study of Cancer Mortality Rates in Spain With Respect to Indices of Solar UVB Irradiance and Smoking." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 120, no. 5, 2007, pp. 1123-8.
Grant WB. An ecologic study of cancer mortality rates in Spain with respect to indices of solar UVB irradiance and smoking. Int J Cancer. 2007;120(5):1123-8.
Grant, W. B. (2007). An ecologic study of cancer mortality rates in Spain with respect to indices of solar UVB irradiance and smoking. International Journal of Cancer, 120(5), pp. 1123-8.
Grant WB. An Ecologic Study of Cancer Mortality Rates in Spain With Respect to Indices of Solar UVB Irradiance and Smoking. Int J Cancer. 2007 Mar 1;120(5):1123-8. PubMed PMID: 17149699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An ecologic study of cancer mortality rates in Spain with respect to indices of solar UVB irradiance and smoking. A1 - Grant,William B, PY - 2006/12/7/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2006/12/7/entrez SP - 1123 EP - 8 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 120 IS - 5 N2 - There is increasing evidence that vitamin D reduces the risk of many types of cancer. Geographic variations in cancer mortality rates in Spain are apparently linked to variations in solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiances and other factors. Cancer mortality rates for 48 continental Spanish provinces for 1978-1992 were used in linear regression analyses with respect to mortality rates for latitude (an index of solar UVB levels), skin cancer (an index of high cumulative UVB irradiance), melanoma (an index related to solar UV irradiance and several other factors) and lung cancer (an index of cumulative effects of smoking). The 9 cancers with mortality rates significantly correlated with latitude for 1 or both sexes were brain, gastric, melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), pancreatic, pleural, rectal and thyroid cancer. Inverse correlations with latitude were found for laryngeal, lung and uterine corpus cancer. The 17 cancers inversely correlated with NMSC are bladder, brain, breast, colon, esophageal, gallbladder, Hodgkin's lymphoma, lung, melanoma, multiple myeloma, NHL, ovarian, pancreatic, pleural, rectal, thyroid and uterine corpus cancer. The 16 correlated with melanoma are bladder, brain, breast, colon, gallbladder, leukemia, lung, multiple myeloma, NHL, ovarian, pancreatic, pleural, prostate, rectal, renal and uterine corpus cancer. The results for lung cancer were in accordance with the literature. These results provide more support for the UVB/vitamin D/cancer hypothesis and indicate a new way to investigate the role of solar UV irradiance on cancer risk. They also provide more evidence that melanoma and NMSC have different etiologies. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17149699/An_ecologic_study_of_cancer_mortality_rates_in_Spain_with_respect_to_indices_of_solar_UVB_irradiance_and_smoking_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22386 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -