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Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jun; 61(6):769-78.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effect of folic acid, vitamin B(6) and B(12) fortified spreads on the blood concentrations of these vitamins and homocysteine.

DESIGN AND SETTING

A 6-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial carried out in a clinical research center.

SUBJECTS

One hundred and fifty healthy volunteers (50% males).

INTERVENTIONS

For 6 weeks, the subjects consumed the test spreads (20 g/day): containing per 20 g (1) 200 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6), or (2) 400 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6) or (3) no B-vitamins (control spread).

RESULTS

The B-vitamin status increased on using the test spreads, with the largest effect on the serum folate concentration: 48% in men and 58% in women on spread 1 and 92 and 146%, respectively, on spread 2 (P-values all <0.05). The plasma homocysteine decreased in the groups treated with the fortified spreads as compared to the control group. Average decreases were for males: 0.7+/-1.5 micromol/l (6.8%) on spread 1 and 1.7+/-1.7 micromol/l (17.6%) on spread 2 and for females: 1.4+/-1.2 micromol/l (14.2%) and 2.4+/-2.0 micromol/l (23.3%), respectively (P-values all <0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of a spread fortified with folic acid, vitamin B(6) and vitamin B(12) for 6 weeks significantly increases the blood concentrations of these vitamins and significantly decreases the plasma concentration of homocysteine. Fortified staple foods like spreads can contribute to the lowering of homocysteine concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

TNO Quality of Life, Zeist, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17151589

Citation

van Vliet, T, et al. "Effect of Fortified Spread On Homocysteine Concentration in Apparently Healthy Volunteers." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 61, no. 6, 2007, pp. 769-78.
van Vliet T, Jacobs RG, de Deckere E, et al. Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007;61(6):769-78.
van Vliet, T., Jacobs, R. G., de Deckere, E., van den Berg, H., de Bree, A., & van der Put, N. M. (2007). Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(6), 769-78.
van Vliet T, et al. Effect of Fortified Spread On Homocysteine Concentration in Apparently Healthy Volunteers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007;61(6):769-78. PubMed PMID: 17151589.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers. AU - van Vliet,T, AU - Jacobs,R G J M, AU - de Deckere,E, AU - van den Berg,H, AU - de Bree,A, AU - van der Put,N M J, Y1 - 2006/12/06/ PY - 2006/12/8/pubmed PY - 2007/7/10/medline PY - 2006/12/8/entrez SP - 769 EP - 78 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 61 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of folic acid, vitamin B(6) and B(12) fortified spreads on the blood concentrations of these vitamins and homocysteine. DESIGN AND SETTING: A 6-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial carried out in a clinical research center. SUBJECTS: One hundred and fifty healthy volunteers (50% males). INTERVENTIONS: For 6 weeks, the subjects consumed the test spreads (20 g/day): containing per 20 g (1) 200 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6), or (2) 400 microg folic acid, 2 microg vitamin B(12) and 1 mg vitamin B(6) or (3) no B-vitamins (control spread). RESULTS: The B-vitamin status increased on using the test spreads, with the largest effect on the serum folate concentration: 48% in men and 58% in women on spread 1 and 92 and 146%, respectively, on spread 2 (P-values all <0.05). The plasma homocysteine decreased in the groups treated with the fortified spreads as compared to the control group. Average decreases were for males: 0.7+/-1.5 micromol/l (6.8%) on spread 1 and 1.7+/-1.7 micromol/l (17.6%) on spread 2 and for females: 1.4+/-1.2 micromol/l (14.2%) and 2.4+/-2.0 micromol/l (23.3%), respectively (P-values all <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of a spread fortified with folic acid, vitamin B(6) and vitamin B(12) for 6 weeks significantly increases the blood concentrations of these vitamins and significantly decreases the plasma concentration of homocysteine. Fortified staple foods like spreads can contribute to the lowering of homocysteine concentrations. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17151589/Effect_of_fortified_spread_on_homocysteine_concentration_in_apparently_healthy_volunteers_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -