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[Epitome, an ignored work of Andreas Vesalius].
Hist Sci Med. 2006 Apr-Jun; 40(2):177-89.HS

Abstract

A few days before De humani corporis fabrica libri septem publication, in 1543, from Oporinus' office at Basel, a very large but not too bulky in-folio was published, which Andreas Vesalius, the author; offered as the Epitome or Summary of the seven Fabricae books. This work, written in latin, is divided into two parts: the first of them includes six chapters describing the human body, the second is composed of eleven anatomical plates with indices; the reader is invited to cut up the last two and stick them onto the preceding, so as to make a human three-dimensional figure. This method inserts the work in a modern conception of anatomical learning. Vesalius involves himself patiently gives many explanations for learning the body in dissection order through plates and text as well. But these plates--and most of them are different from those in the Fabrica-, are not simple illustrations, but play an active part in anatomical knowledge acquisition, just as the text does, but through a different access. We will attract your attention on this originality, often ignored, of the Epitome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université François- Rabelais de Tours, CESR/CNRS-UMR 6576. jacqueline.vons@wanadoo.fr

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

17152529

Citation

Vons, Jacqueline. "[Epitome, an Ignored Work of Andreas Vesalius]." Histoire Des Sciences Medicales, vol. 40, no. 2, 2006, pp. 177-89.
Vons J. [Epitome, an ignored work of Andreas Vesalius]. Hist Sci Med. 2006;40(2):177-89.
Vons, J. (2006). [Epitome, an ignored work of Andreas Vesalius]. Histoire Des Sciences Medicales, 40(2), 177-89.
Vons J. [Epitome, an Ignored Work of Andreas Vesalius]. Hist Sci Med. 2006 Apr-Jun;40(2):177-89. PubMed PMID: 17152529.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Epitome, an ignored work of Andreas Vesalius]. A1 - Vons,Jacqueline, PY - 2006/12/13/pubmed PY - 2007/3/17/medline PY - 2006/12/13/entrez SP - 177 EP - 89 JF - Histoire des sciences medicales JO - Hist Sci Med VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - A few days before De humani corporis fabrica libri septem publication, in 1543, from Oporinus' office at Basel, a very large but not too bulky in-folio was published, which Andreas Vesalius, the author; offered as the Epitome or Summary of the seven Fabricae books. This work, written in latin, is divided into two parts: the first of them includes six chapters describing the human body, the second is composed of eleven anatomical plates with indices; the reader is invited to cut up the last two and stick them onto the preceding, so as to make a human three-dimensional figure. This method inserts the work in a modern conception of anatomical learning. Vesalius involves himself patiently gives many explanations for learning the body in dissection order through plates and text as well. But these plates--and most of them are different from those in the Fabrica-, are not simple illustrations, but play an active part in anatomical knowledge acquisition, just as the text does, but through a different access. We will attract your attention on this originality, often ignored, of the Epitome. SN - 0440-8888 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17152529/[Epitome_an_ignored_work_of_Andreas_Vesalius]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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