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Celiac disease and risk of liver disease: a general population-based study.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Jan; 5(1):63-69.e1.CG

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Celiac disease (CD) is an important cause of hypertransaminasemia. CD might also be associated with severe forms of liver disease. We investigated the risk of liver disease in 13,818 patients with CD (1964-2003) and 66,584 age- and sex-matched reference individuals from a general population cohort.

METHODS

We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for later liver disease and conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk of CD in individuals with liver disease before study entry.

RESULTS

CD was associated with an increased risk of acute hepatitis (HR, 5.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.88-14.40; P = .001), chronic hepatitis (HR, 5.84; 95% CI, 2.89-11.79; P < .001), primary sclerosing cholangitis (HR, 4.46; 95% CI, 2.50-7.98; P < .001), fatty liver (HR, 6.06; 95% CI, 1.35-27.16; P = .018), liver failure (HR, 3.30; 95% CI, 2.22-4.88; P < .001), liver cirrhosis or liver fibrosis (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.34-3.72; P < .001), and primary biliary cirrhosis (HR, 10.16; 95% CI, 2.61-39.49; P < .001). There was no increased risk of liver transplantation (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.12-9.62; P = .954). Adjustment for socioeconomic index or diabetes mellitus had no notable effect on the risk estimates. Prior liver disease was associated with a statistically significant 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of later CD.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that individuals with CD are at increased risk of both prior and subsequent liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. jonasludvigsson@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17161656

Citation

Ludvigsson, Jonas F., et al. "Celiac Disease and Risk of Liver Disease: a General Population-based Study." Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, vol. 5, no. 1, 2007, pp. 63-69.e1.
Ludvigsson JF, Elfström P, Broomé U, et al. Celiac disease and risk of liver disease: a general population-based study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;5(1):63-69.e1.
Ludvigsson, J. F., Elfström, P., Broomé, U., Ekbom, A., & Montgomery, S. M. (2007). Celiac disease and risk of liver disease: a general population-based study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, 5(1), 63-e1.
Ludvigsson JF, et al. Celiac Disease and Risk of Liver Disease: a General Population-based Study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007;5(1):63-69.e1. PubMed PMID: 17161656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Celiac disease and risk of liver disease: a general population-based study. AU - Ludvigsson,Jonas F, AU - Elfström,Peter, AU - Broomé,Ulrika, AU - Ekbom,Anders, AU - Montgomery,Scott M, Y1 - 2006/12/08/ PY - 2006/12/13/pubmed PY - 2007/4/4/medline PY - 2006/12/13/entrez SP - 63 EP - 69.e1 JF - Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association JO - Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease (CD) is an important cause of hypertransaminasemia. CD might also be associated with severe forms of liver disease. We investigated the risk of liver disease in 13,818 patients with CD (1964-2003) and 66,584 age- and sex-matched reference individuals from a general population cohort. METHODS: We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for later liver disease and conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk of CD in individuals with liver disease before study entry. RESULTS: CD was associated with an increased risk of acute hepatitis (HR, 5.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.88-14.40; P = .001), chronic hepatitis (HR, 5.84; 95% CI, 2.89-11.79; P < .001), primary sclerosing cholangitis (HR, 4.46; 95% CI, 2.50-7.98; P < .001), fatty liver (HR, 6.06; 95% CI, 1.35-27.16; P = .018), liver failure (HR, 3.30; 95% CI, 2.22-4.88; P < .001), liver cirrhosis or liver fibrosis (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.34-3.72; P < .001), and primary biliary cirrhosis (HR, 10.16; 95% CI, 2.61-39.49; P < .001). There was no increased risk of liver transplantation (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.12-9.62; P = .954). Adjustment for socioeconomic index or diabetes mellitus had no notable effect on the risk estimates. Prior liver disease was associated with a statistically significant 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of later CD. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that individuals with CD are at increased risk of both prior and subsequent liver disease. SN - 1542-7714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17161656/Celiac_disease_and_risk_of_liver_disease:_a_general_population_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1542-3565(06)00970-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -