Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Statistical model for predicting non-heme iron bioavailability from vegetarian meals.

Abstract

Availability of non-heme iron has been extensively discussed when meals comprise heme as well as non-heme iron, but seldom so for exclusively vegetarian meals. The present study aimed to develop a statistical model for predicting non-heme iron availability from a composite vegetarian meal. Radioisotopic measurements of in vitro iron dialyzability of 208 out of 274 meals representing vegetarian diets from Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America and the meal contents of iron, zinc, copper, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, folic acid, tannic acid, fiber and degraded phytate forms (IP6-IP1) were used for development of the model. A multiple regression model weighted for calorie contents was developed for the percentage iron dialyzability with the possible predictors as meal contents along with plausible interaction terms. The model was validated with in vitro iron dialyzability of 66 meals and in vivo iron absorption in five ileostomized adults. Application of the model was demonstrated using data on the daily dietary intake of 215 young adults whose hemoglobin levels were estimated twice in 3 weeks. Weighted multiple regression model was: ln(% Fe dialyzability)=1.340-0.259xln(IP2 [mg])+0.188xln(IP3 [mg])-0.278xln(IP5 [mg])+0.0912xln(ascorbic acid [mg])+0.06693xln(tannins [mg])+0.09552xln(beta-carotene [microg])+0.137xln(hemicellulose [g]) (P<0.01, R2=0.51). Good agreement was seen between observed and predicted dialyzability (r=0.90) and human absorption (r=0.89). The model would be useful to estimate bioavailable iron intakes of vegetarian populations and to identify at-risk individuals.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Agharkar Research Institute, Agarakar Road, Pune, 411 004, India. shashi49@indiainfo.com

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Ascorbic Acid
    Biological Availability
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Female
    Folic Acid
    Hemoglobins
    Humans
    Intestinal Absorption
    Iron
    Male
    Micronutrients
    Models, Statistical
    Nonheme Iron Proteins
    Phytic Acid
    Polysaccharides
    Tannins
    Trace Elements
    Zinc
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Validation Studies

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17162323

    Citation

    Chiplonkar, Shashi A., and Vaishali V. Agte. "Statistical Model for Predicting Non-heme Iron Bioavailability From Vegetarian Meals." International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 7-8, 2006, pp. 434-50.
    Chiplonkar SA, Agte VV. Statistical model for predicting non-heme iron bioavailability from vegetarian meals. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2006;57(7-8):434-50.
    Chiplonkar, S. A., & Agte, V. V. (2006). Statistical model for predicting non-heme iron bioavailability from vegetarian meals. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 57(7-8), pp. 434-50.
    Chiplonkar SA, Agte VV. Statistical Model for Predicting Non-heme Iron Bioavailability From Vegetarian Meals. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2006;57(7-8):434-50. PubMed PMID: 17162323.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Statistical model for predicting non-heme iron bioavailability from vegetarian meals. AU - Chiplonkar,Shashi A, AU - Agte,Vaishali V, PY - 2006/12/13/pubmed PY - 2007/7/24/medline PY - 2006/12/13/entrez SP - 434 EP - 50 JF - International journal of food sciences and nutrition JO - Int J Food Sci Nutr VL - 57 IS - 7-8 N2 - Availability of non-heme iron has been extensively discussed when meals comprise heme as well as non-heme iron, but seldom so for exclusively vegetarian meals. The present study aimed to develop a statistical model for predicting non-heme iron availability from a composite vegetarian meal. Radioisotopic measurements of in vitro iron dialyzability of 208 out of 274 meals representing vegetarian diets from Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America and the meal contents of iron, zinc, copper, ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, folic acid, tannic acid, fiber and degraded phytate forms (IP6-IP1) were used for development of the model. A multiple regression model weighted for calorie contents was developed for the percentage iron dialyzability with the possible predictors as meal contents along with plausible interaction terms. The model was validated with in vitro iron dialyzability of 66 meals and in vivo iron absorption in five ileostomized adults. Application of the model was demonstrated using data on the daily dietary intake of 215 young adults whose hemoglobin levels were estimated twice in 3 weeks. Weighted multiple regression model was: ln(% Fe dialyzability)=1.340-0.259xln(IP2 [mg])+0.188xln(IP3 [mg])-0.278xln(IP5 [mg])+0.0912xln(ascorbic acid [mg])+0.06693xln(tannins [mg])+0.09552xln(beta-carotene [microg])+0.137xln(hemicellulose [g]) (P<0.01, R2=0.51). Good agreement was seen between observed and predicted dialyzability (r=0.90) and human absorption (r=0.89). The model would be useful to estimate bioavailable iron intakes of vegetarian populations and to identify at-risk individuals. SN - 0963-7486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17162323/Statistical_model_for_predicting_non_heme_iron_bioavailability_from_vegetarian_meals_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09637480600836833 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -