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Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men.
Int J Cancer 2007; 120(5):970-7IJ

Abstract

Case-control studies indicate that vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids decrease risk of oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and oral cancer, but clinical trials have failed to find protective effects of beta-carotene and suggest that vitamin E may increase risk. The authors prospectively evaluated the association between intake of vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids and incidence of OPL. Participants were 42,340 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who provided information on supplement use and diet every 2-4 years by food frequency questionnaire. The authors confirmed 207 clinically or histopathologically diagnosed OPL events occurring between 1986 and 2002 by medical record review. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RR) of OPL were calculated with proportional hazards models. Total intake of vitamin C, vitamin A or carotenoids was not significantly associated with OPL risk. Dietary vitamin C was significantly associated with reduced risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.85, p(trend) = 0.04), but no association with supplemental vitamin C was observed. Inverse associations were apparent for beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-carotene intake. No clear relationship emerged with beta-carotene, lycopene or lutein/zeaxanthin. Vitamin E was associated with increased risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.19), particularly among current smokers and with supplemental intake (current-smokers, supplement dose tertile 3 vs. 1, RR = 3.07, 95% CI 1.28-7.34, p(trend) = 0.01). For current smokers, beta-carotene also increased risk. Vitamin C from dietary sources, but not supplements, was associated with a reduced risk of OPL. The observed increased risk for current smokers with high vitamin E or beta-carotene intake should be explored further.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. nmaserej@post.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17163413

Citation

Maserejian, Nancy Nairi, et al. "Prospective Study of Vitamins C, E, and a and Carotenoids and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 120, no. 5, 2007, pp. 970-7.
Maserejian NN, Giovannucci E, Rosner B, et al. Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. Int J Cancer. 2007;120(5):970-7.
Maserejian, N. N., Giovannucci, E., Rosner, B., & Joshipura, K. (2007). Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. International Journal of Cancer, 120(5), pp. 970-7.
Maserejian NN, et al. Prospective Study of Vitamins C, E, and a and Carotenoids and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men. Int J Cancer. 2007 Mar 1;120(5):970-7. PubMed PMID: 17163413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. AU - Maserejian,Nancy Nairi, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Joshipura,Kaumudi, PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - 970 EP - 7 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 120 IS - 5 N2 - Case-control studies indicate that vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids decrease risk of oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and oral cancer, but clinical trials have failed to find protective effects of beta-carotene and suggest that vitamin E may increase risk. The authors prospectively evaluated the association between intake of vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids and incidence of OPL. Participants were 42,340 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who provided information on supplement use and diet every 2-4 years by food frequency questionnaire. The authors confirmed 207 clinically or histopathologically diagnosed OPL events occurring between 1986 and 2002 by medical record review. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RR) of OPL were calculated with proportional hazards models. Total intake of vitamin C, vitamin A or carotenoids was not significantly associated with OPL risk. Dietary vitamin C was significantly associated with reduced risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.85, p(trend) = 0.04), but no association with supplemental vitamin C was observed. Inverse associations were apparent for beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-carotene intake. No clear relationship emerged with beta-carotene, lycopene or lutein/zeaxanthin. Vitamin E was associated with increased risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.19), particularly among current smokers and with supplemental intake (current-smokers, supplement dose tertile 3 vs. 1, RR = 3.07, 95% CI 1.28-7.34, p(trend) = 0.01). For current smokers, beta-carotene also increased risk. Vitamin C from dietary sources, but not supplements, was associated with a reduced risk of OPL. The observed increased risk for current smokers with high vitamin E or beta-carotene intake should be explored further. SN - 0020-7136 UR - http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17163413/Prospective_study_of_vitamins_C_E_and_A_and_carotenoids_and_risk_of_oral_premalignant_lesions_in_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22448 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -