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Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men.

Abstract

Case-control studies indicate that vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids decrease risk of oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and oral cancer, but clinical trials have failed to find protective effects of beta-carotene and suggest that vitamin E may increase risk. The authors prospectively evaluated the association between intake of vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids and incidence of OPL. Participants were 42,340 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who provided information on supplement use and diet every 2-4 years by food frequency questionnaire. The authors confirmed 207 clinically or histopathologically diagnosed OPL events occurring between 1986 and 2002 by medical record review. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RR) of OPL were calculated with proportional hazards models. Total intake of vitamin C, vitamin A or carotenoids was not significantly associated with OPL risk. Dietary vitamin C was significantly associated with reduced risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.85, p(trend) = 0.04), but no association with supplemental vitamin C was observed. Inverse associations were apparent for beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-carotene intake. No clear relationship emerged with beta-carotene, lycopene or lutein/zeaxanthin. Vitamin E was associated with increased risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.19), particularly among current smokers and with supplemental intake (current-smokers, supplement dose tertile 3 vs. 1, RR = 3.07, 95% CI 1.28-7.34, p(trend) = 0.01). For current smokers, beta-carotene also increased risk. Vitamin C from dietary sources, but not supplements, was associated with a reduced risk of OPL. The observed increased risk for current smokers with high vitamin E or beta-carotene intake should be explored further.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. nmaserej@post.harvard.edu

    , ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 120:5 2007 Mar 01 pg 970-7

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carotenoids
    Case-Control Studies
    Cryptoxanthins
    Diet
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Mouth Neoplasms
    Precancerous Conditions
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    United States
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin E
    Vitamins
    Xanthophylls
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17163413

    Citation

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi, et al. "Prospective Study of Vitamins C, E, and a and Carotenoids and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 120, no. 5, 2007, pp. 970-7.
    Maserejian NN, Giovannucci E, Rosner B, et al. Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. Int J Cancer. 2007;120(5):970-7.
    Maserejian, N. N., Giovannucci, E., Rosner, B., & Joshipura, K. (2007). Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. International Journal of Cancer, 120(5), pp. 970-7.
    Maserejian NN, et al. Prospective Study of Vitamins C, E, and a and Carotenoids and Risk of Oral Premalignant Lesions in Men. Int J Cancer. 2007 Mar 1;120(5):970-7. PubMed PMID: 17163413.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of vitamins C, E, and A and carotenoids and risk of oral premalignant lesions in men. AU - Maserejian,Nancy Nairi, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Joshipura,Kaumudi, PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/3/14/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - 970 EP - 7 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 120 IS - 5 N2 - Case-control studies indicate that vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids decrease risk of oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and oral cancer, but clinical trials have failed to find protective effects of beta-carotene and suggest that vitamin E may increase risk. The authors prospectively evaluated the association between intake of vitamins C, E, A and carotenoids and incidence of OPL. Participants were 42,340 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who provided information on supplement use and diet every 2-4 years by food frequency questionnaire. The authors confirmed 207 clinically or histopathologically diagnosed OPL events occurring between 1986 and 2002 by medical record review. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RR) of OPL were calculated with proportional hazards models. Total intake of vitamin C, vitamin A or carotenoids was not significantly associated with OPL risk. Dietary vitamin C was significantly associated with reduced risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.31-0.85, p(trend) = 0.04), but no association with supplemental vitamin C was observed. Inverse associations were apparent for beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-carotene intake. No clear relationship emerged with beta-carotene, lycopene or lutein/zeaxanthin. Vitamin E was associated with increased risk (quintile 5 vs. 1, RR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.19), particularly among current smokers and with supplemental intake (current-smokers, supplement dose tertile 3 vs. 1, RR = 3.07, 95% CI 1.28-7.34, p(trend) = 0.01). For current smokers, beta-carotene also increased risk. Vitamin C from dietary sources, but not supplements, was associated with a reduced risk of OPL. The observed increased risk for current smokers with high vitamin E or beta-carotene intake should be explored further. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17163413/Prospective_study_of_vitamins_C_E_and_A_and_carotenoids_and_risk_of_oral_premalignant_lesions_in_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.22448 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -