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Differentiation between mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease and depression by means of cued recall.
Psychol Med 2007; 37(5):747-55PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Discriminating Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from depression is a challenge in psychogeriatric medicine. A study was set up to ascertain whether cued recall could be useful in differentiating early AD and MCI from depression among elderly individuals.

METHOD

The Visual Association Test (VAT) and the Memory Impairment Screen-plus (MIS-plus) were administered together with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to 40 MCI patients, 35 mild AD patients, 46 depressed patients and 52 healthy control subjects.

RESULTS

A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post-hoc Scheffé tests showed that AD patients had significantly lower cued recall scores (i.e. combined VAT and MIS-plus scores) than MCI patients, who in turn had lower scores than depressed patients. The scores of depressed patients and controls were not significantly different. Discriminant analysis revealed that 94% of the AD patients and 96% of the depressed patients could be classified correctly by means of the GDS and the cued recall sores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves identified an optimal cut-off score of 8 (maximum score 12) for differentiating AD and MCI patients from depressed elderly patients and controls. Applying this cut-off, a sensitivity of 83% (58%) and a specificity of 85% (85%) was obtained when differentiating AD (MCI) from depression.

CONCLUSIONS

Cued recall, operationalized by the combined scores of VAT and MIS-plus, is a useful method for differentiating AD patients from depressed individuals and healthy controls. Probably because of the great heterogeneity among MCI patients, the diagnostic power of cued recall decreases when applied to differentiate MCI from depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Developmental and Lifespan Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. eva.dierckx@vub.ac.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17164030

Citation

Dierckx, E, et al. "Differentiation Between Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's Disease and Depression By Means of Cued Recall." Psychological Medicine, vol. 37, no. 5, 2007, pp. 747-55.
Dierckx E, Engelborghs S, De Raedt R, et al. Differentiation between mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease and depression by means of cued recall. Psychol Med. 2007;37(5):747-55.
Dierckx, E., Engelborghs, S., De Raedt, R., De Deyn, P. P., & Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, I. (2007). Differentiation between mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease and depression by means of cued recall. Psychological Medicine, 37(5), pp. 747-55.
Dierckx E, et al. Differentiation Between Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's Disease and Depression By Means of Cued Recall. Psychol Med. 2007;37(5):747-55. PubMed PMID: 17164030.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differentiation between mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease and depression by means of cued recall. AU - Dierckx,E, AU - Engelborghs,S, AU - De Raedt,R, AU - De Deyn,P P, AU - Ponjaert-Kristoffersen,I, Y1 - 2006/12/13/ PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/7/20/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - 747 EP - 55 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 37 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Discriminating Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from depression is a challenge in psychogeriatric medicine. A study was set up to ascertain whether cued recall could be useful in differentiating early AD and MCI from depression among elderly individuals. METHOD: The Visual Association Test (VAT) and the Memory Impairment Screen-plus (MIS-plus) were administered together with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to 40 MCI patients, 35 mild AD patients, 46 depressed patients and 52 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post-hoc Scheffé tests showed that AD patients had significantly lower cued recall scores (i.e. combined VAT and MIS-plus scores) than MCI patients, who in turn had lower scores than depressed patients. The scores of depressed patients and controls were not significantly different. Discriminant analysis revealed that 94% of the AD patients and 96% of the depressed patients could be classified correctly by means of the GDS and the cued recall sores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves identified an optimal cut-off score of 8 (maximum score 12) for differentiating AD and MCI patients from depressed elderly patients and controls. Applying this cut-off, a sensitivity of 83% (58%) and a specificity of 85% (85%) was obtained when differentiating AD (MCI) from depression. CONCLUSIONS: Cued recall, operationalized by the combined scores of VAT and MIS-plus, is a useful method for differentiating AD patients from depressed individuals and healthy controls. Probably because of the great heterogeneity among MCI patients, the diagnostic power of cued recall decreases when applied to differentiate MCI from depression. SN - 0033-2917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17164030/Differentiation_between_mild_cognitive_impairment_Alzheimer's_disease_and_depression_by_means_of_cued_recall_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S003329170600955X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -