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Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants have been proposed to reduce the risk of renal cell cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined the intakes of fruits, vegetables, and antioxidant vitamins in relation to the risk of renal cell cancer.

METHODS

We prospectively examined the associations between the intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer in women and men. We followed 88,759 women in the Nurses' Health Study from 1980 to 2000, and 47,828 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1986 to 2000. We assessed dietary intake every 2 to 4 years using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate study-specific multivariate relative risks (RR), which were pooled using a random effects model.

RESULTS

A total of 248 (132 women and 116 men) incident renal cell cancer cases were ascertained during 2,316,525 person-years of follow-up. The consumption of fruits and vegetables was associated with a decreased risk of renal cell cancer in men (multivariate RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.25-0.81, for >or=6 servings of fruit and vegetable intake/d versus <3 servings/d; P test for trend = 0.02), but not in women (multivariate RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.66-2.07, for the same contrast; P test for trend = 0.25; P test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.02). Intakes of vitamins A and C from food and carotenoids were inversely associated with the risk of renal cell cancer in men only, but we cannot exclude the possibility that this was due to other factors in fruit and vegetables. No clear association was observed for vitamin E in women or men.

CONCLUSIONS

Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of renal cell cancer in men.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jung.lee@channing.harvard.edu

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carcinoma, Renal Cell
    Carotenoids
    Diet Records
    Female
    Fruit
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Sex Factors
    United States
    Vegetables
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin E
    Vitamins

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17164369

    Citation

    Lee, Jung Eun, et al. "Intakes of Fruits, Vegetables, Vitamins A, C, and E, and Carotenoids and Risk of Renal Cell Cancer." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 15, no. 12, 2006, pp. 2445-52.
    Lee JE, Giovannucci E, Smith-Warner SA, et al. Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(12):2445-52.
    Lee, J. E., Giovannucci, E., Smith-Warner, S. A., Spiegelman, D., Willett, W. C., & Curhan, G. C. (2006). Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 15(12), pp. 2445-52.
    Lee JE, et al. Intakes of Fruits, Vegetables, Vitamins A, C, and E, and Carotenoids and Risk of Renal Cell Cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(12):2445-52. PubMed PMID: 17164369.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer. AU - Lee,Jung Eun, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Curhan,Gary C, PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/4/10/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - 2445 EP - 52 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 15 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Fruits and vegetables rich in antioxidants have been proposed to reduce the risk of renal cell cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined the intakes of fruits, vegetables, and antioxidant vitamins in relation to the risk of renal cell cancer. METHODS: We prospectively examined the associations between the intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer in women and men. We followed 88,759 women in the Nurses' Health Study from 1980 to 2000, and 47,828 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1986 to 2000. We assessed dietary intake every 2 to 4 years using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate study-specific multivariate relative risks (RR), which were pooled using a random effects model. RESULTS: A total of 248 (132 women and 116 men) incident renal cell cancer cases were ascertained during 2,316,525 person-years of follow-up. The consumption of fruits and vegetables was associated with a decreased risk of renal cell cancer in men (multivariate RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.25-0.81, for >or=6 servings of fruit and vegetable intake/d versus <3 servings/d; P test for trend = 0.02), but not in women (multivariate RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.66-2.07, for the same contrast; P test for trend = 0.25; P test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.02). Intakes of vitamins A and C from food and carotenoids were inversely associated with the risk of renal cell cancer in men only, but we cannot exclude the possibility that this was due to other factors in fruit and vegetables. No clear association was observed for vitamin E in women or men. CONCLUSIONS: Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of renal cell cancer in men. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17164369/Intakes_of_fruits_vegetables_vitamins_A_C_and_E_and_carotenoids_and_risk_of_renal_cell_cancer_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17164369 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -