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Risk factors for hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

Abstract

The effect of classic breast cancer risk factors on hormone receptor-defined breast cancer is not fully clarified. We explored these associations in a Swedish population-based study. Postmenopausal women ages 50 to 74 years, diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during 1993 to 1995, were compared with 3,065 age frequency-matched controls. We identified 332 estrogen receptor (ER-) and progesterone receptor (PR-) negative, 286 ER+PR-, 71 ER-PR+, 1,165 ER+PR+, and 789 tumors with unknown receptor status. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Women ages >or=30 years, compared with those ages 20 to 24 years at first birth, were at an increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8) but not ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Women who gained >or=30 kg in weight during adulthood had an approximately 3-fold increased relative risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.9-3.8), but no risk increase of ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5-2.1), compared with women who gained <10 kg. Compared with never users, women who used menopausal estrogen-progestin therapy for at least 5 years were at increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 2.1-4.1) but not ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5). In conclusion, other risk factors were similarly related to breast cancer regardless of receptor status, but high age at first birth, substantial weight gain in adult age, and use of menopausal estrogen-progestin therapy were more strongly related to receptor-positive breast cancer than receptor-negative breast cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. lena.u.rosenberg@ki.se

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Breast Neoplasms
    Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast
    Carcinoma, Lobular
    Case-Control Studies
    Estrogens
    Female
    Hormone Replacement Therapy
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Postmenopause
    Progestins
    Receptors, Estrogen
    Receptors, Progesterone
    Risk Factors
    Sweden
    Weight Gain

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17164374

    Citation

    Rosenberg, Lena U., et al. "Risk Factors for Hormone Receptor-defined Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 15, no. 12, 2006, pp. 2482-8.
    Rosenberg LU, Einarsdóttir K, Friman EI, et al. Risk factors for hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(12):2482-8.
    Rosenberg, L. U., Einarsdóttir, K., Friman, E. I., Wedrén, S., Dickman, P. W., Hall, P., & Magnusson, C. (2006). Risk factors for hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 15(12), pp. 2482-8.
    Rosenberg LU, et al. Risk Factors for Hormone Receptor-defined Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(12):2482-8. PubMed PMID: 17164374.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for hormone receptor-defined breast cancer in postmenopausal women. AU - Rosenberg,Lena U, AU - Einarsdóttir,Kristjana, AU - Friman,Erika Isaksson, AU - Wedrén,Sara, AU - Dickman,Paul W, AU - Hall,Per, AU - Magnusson,Cecilia, PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/4/10/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - 2482 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 15 IS - 12 N2 - The effect of classic breast cancer risk factors on hormone receptor-defined breast cancer is not fully clarified. We explored these associations in a Swedish population-based study. Postmenopausal women ages 50 to 74 years, diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during 1993 to 1995, were compared with 3,065 age frequency-matched controls. We identified 332 estrogen receptor (ER-) and progesterone receptor (PR-) negative, 286 ER+PR-, 71 ER-PR+, 1,165 ER+PR+, and 789 tumors with unknown receptor status. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Women ages >or=30 years, compared with those ages 20 to 24 years at first birth, were at an increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8) but not ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Women who gained >or=30 kg in weight during adulthood had an approximately 3-fold increased relative risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.9-3.8), but no risk increase of ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5-2.1), compared with women who gained <10 kg. Compared with never users, women who used menopausal estrogen-progestin therapy for at least 5 years were at increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 2.1-4.1) but not ER-PR- tumors (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5). In conclusion, other risk factors were similarly related to breast cancer regardless of receptor status, but high age at first birth, substantial weight gain in adult age, and use of menopausal estrogen-progestin therapy were more strongly related to receptor-positive breast cancer than receptor-negative breast cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17164374/Risk_factors_for_hormone_receptor_defined_breast_cancer_in_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17164374 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -