Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Resistance to high-fat diet in the female progeny of obese mice fed a control diet during the periconceptual, gestation, and lactation periods.
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2007; 292(4):E1095-100AJ

Abstract

With the worldwide epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MetS), the proportion of women that are overweight/obese and overfed during pregnancy has increased. The resulting abnormal uterine environment may have deleterious effects on fetal metabolic programming and lead to MetS in adulthood. A balanced/restricted diet and/or physical exercise often improve metabolic abnormalities in individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). We investigated whether reducing fat intake during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period in mothers with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity could be used to modify fetal/neonatal MetS programming positively, thereby preventing MetS. First generation (F1) C57BL/6J female mice with HFD-induced obesity and T2D were crossed with F1 males on control diet (CD). These F1 females were switched to a CD during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period. At weaning, both male and female second generation (F2) mice were fed a HFD. Weight, caloric intake, lipid parameters, glucose, and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Sensitivity/resistance to the HFD differed significantly between generations and sexes. A similar proportion of the F1 and F2 males (80%) developed hyperphagia, obesity, and T2D. In contrast, a significantly higher proportion of the F2 females (43%) than of the previous F1 generation (17%) were resistant (P<0.01). Despite having free access to the HFD, these female mice were no longer hyperphagic and remained lean, with normal insulin sensitivity and glycemia but mild hypercholesterolemia and glucose intolerance, thus displaying a "satiety phenotype." This suggests that an appropriate dietary fatty acid profile and intake during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period helps the female offspring to cope with deleterious intrauterine conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Université Paris-Descartes, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17164437

Citation

Gallou-Kabani, Catherine, et al. "Resistance to High-fat Diet in the Female Progeny of Obese Mice Fed a Control Diet During the Periconceptual, Gestation, and Lactation Periods." American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 292, no. 4, 2007, pp. E1095-100.
Gallou-Kabani C, Vigé A, Gross MS, et al. Resistance to high-fat diet in the female progeny of obese mice fed a control diet during the periconceptual, gestation, and lactation periods. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2007;292(4):E1095-100.
Gallou-Kabani, C., Vigé, A., Gross, M. S., Boileau, C., Rabes, J. P., Fruchart-Najib, J., ... Junien, C. (2007). Resistance to high-fat diet in the female progeny of obese mice fed a control diet during the periconceptual, gestation, and lactation periods. American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, 292(4), pp. E1095-100.
Gallou-Kabani C, et al. Resistance to High-fat Diet in the Female Progeny of Obese Mice Fed a Control Diet During the Periconceptual, Gestation, and Lactation Periods. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2007;292(4):E1095-100. PubMed PMID: 17164437.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resistance to high-fat diet in the female progeny of obese mice fed a control diet during the periconceptual, gestation, and lactation periods. AU - Gallou-Kabani,Catherine, AU - Vigé,Alexandre, AU - Gross,Marie-Sylvie, AU - Boileau,Catherine, AU - Rabes,Jean-Pierre, AU - Fruchart-Najib,Jamilla, AU - Jais,Jean-Philippe, AU - Junien,Claudine, Y1 - 2006/12/12/ PY - 2006/12/14/pubmed PY - 2007/5/22/medline PY - 2006/12/14/entrez SP - E1095 EP - 100 JF - American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism JO - Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 292 IS - 4 N2 - With the worldwide epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MetS), the proportion of women that are overweight/obese and overfed during pregnancy has increased. The resulting abnormal uterine environment may have deleterious effects on fetal metabolic programming and lead to MetS in adulthood. A balanced/restricted diet and/or physical exercise often improve metabolic abnormalities in individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). We investigated whether reducing fat intake during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period in mothers with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity could be used to modify fetal/neonatal MetS programming positively, thereby preventing MetS. First generation (F1) C57BL/6J female mice with HFD-induced obesity and T2D were crossed with F1 males on control diet (CD). These F1 females were switched to a CD during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period. At weaning, both male and female second generation (F2) mice were fed a HFD. Weight, caloric intake, lipid parameters, glucose, and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Sensitivity/resistance to the HFD differed significantly between generations and sexes. A similar proportion of the F1 and F2 males (80%) developed hyperphagia, obesity, and T2D. In contrast, a significantly higher proportion of the F2 females (43%) than of the previous F1 generation (17%) were resistant (P<0.01). Despite having free access to the HFD, these female mice were no longer hyperphagic and remained lean, with normal insulin sensitivity and glycemia but mild hypercholesterolemia and glucose intolerance, thus displaying a "satiety phenotype." This suggests that an appropriate dietary fatty acid profile and intake during the periconceptual/gestation/lactation period helps the female offspring to cope with deleterious intrauterine conditions. SN - 0193-1849 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17164437/Resistance_to_high_fat_diet_in_the_female_progeny_of_obese_mice_fed_a_control_diet_during_the_periconceptual_gestation_and_lactation_periods_ L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpendo.00390.2006?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -